Next Issue
Previous Issue

Table of Contents

Behav. Sci., Volume 2, Issue 4 (December 2012), Pages 207-218

  • Issues are regarded as officially published after their release is announced to the table of contents alert mailing list.
  • You may sign up for e-mail alerts to receive table of contents of newly released issues.
  • PDF is the official format for papers published in both, html and pdf forms. To view the papers in pdf format, click on the "PDF Full-text" link, and use the free Adobe Readerexternal link to open them.
View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-1
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle Working Memory, Language Skills, and Autism Symptomatology
Behav. Sci. 2012, 2(4), 207-218; doi:10.3390/bs2040207
Received: 10 August 2012 / Revised: 23 September 2012 / Accepted: 12 October 2012 / Published: 2 November 2012
Cited by 11 | PDF Full-text (269 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
While many studies have reported working memory (WM) impairments in autism spectrum disorders, others do not. Sample characteristics, WM domain, and task complexity likely contribute to these discrepancies. Although deficits in visuospatial WM have been more consistently documented, there is much controversy regarding
[...] Read more.
While many studies have reported working memory (WM) impairments in autism spectrum disorders, others do not. Sample characteristics, WM domain, and task complexity likely contribute to these discrepancies. Although deficits in visuospatial WM have been more consistently documented, there is much controversy regarding verbal WM in autism. The goal of the current study was to explore visuospatial and verbal WM in a well-controlled sample of children with high-functioning autism (HFA) and typical development. Individuals ages 9–17 with HFA (n = 18) and typical development (n = 18), were carefully matched on gender, age, IQ, and language, and were administered a series of standardized visuospatial and verbal WM tasks. The HFA group displayed significant impairment across WM domains. No differences in performance were noted across WM tasks for either the HFA or typically developing groups. Over and above nonverbal cognition, WM abilities accounted for significant variance in language skills and symptom severity. The current study suggests broad WM limitations in HFA. We further suggest that deficits in verbal WM are observed in more complex tasks, as well as in simpler tasks, such as phonological WM. Increased task complexity and linguistic demands may influence WM abilities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Learning and Memory Deficits Related to Neuropsychiatric Disorders)

Journal Contact

MDPI AG
Behavioral Sciences Editorial Office
St. Alban-Anlage 66, 4052 Basel, Switzerland
behavsci@mdpi.com
Tel. +41 61 683 77 34
Fax: +41 61 302 89 18
Editorial Board
Contact Details Submit to Behavioral Sciences
Back to Top