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Med. Sci., Volume 1, Issue 1 (December 2013), Pages 1-48

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial Welcome to Medical Sciences: A New Open Access Platform for Research on Basic Medicines
Med. Sci. 2013, 1(1), 1; doi:10.3390/medsci1010001
Received: 20 March 2013 / Accepted: 3 April 2013 / Published: 11 April 2013
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Abstract
The scientific world is filled with both challenges and opportunities across disciplines. Around the world, all look for opportunities to improve the economy by investing in biomedical research, as well as in biotechnology. Within biotechnology, drug discovery and therapeutics remain the mainstays [...] Read more.
The scientific world is filled with both challenges and opportunities across disciplines. Around the world, all look for opportunities to improve the economy by investing in biomedical research, as well as in biotechnology. Within biotechnology, drug discovery and therapeutics remain the mainstays of biomedical research. [...] Full article

Research

Jump to: Editorial, Review

Open AccessArticle Response of Differentiated Human Airway Epithelia to Alcohol Exposure and Klebsiella pneumoniae Challenge
Med. Sci. 2013, 1(1), 2-19; doi:10.3390/medsci1010002
Received: 3 July 2013 / Revised: 19 July 2013 / Accepted: 22 July 2013 / Published: 26 July 2013
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Abstract
Alcohol abuse has been associated with increased susceptibility to pulmonary infection. It is not fully defined how alcohol contributes to the host defense compromise. Here primary human airway epithelial cells were cultured at an air-liquid interface to form a differentiated and polarized [...] Read more.
Alcohol abuse has been associated with increased susceptibility to pulmonary infection. It is not fully defined how alcohol contributes to the host defense compromise. Here primary human airway epithelial cells were cultured at an air-liquid interface to form a differentiated and polarized epithelium. This unique culture model allowed us to closely mimic lung infection in the context of alcohol abuse by basolateral alcohol exposure and apical live bacterial challenge. Application of clinically relevant concentrations of alcohol for 24 h did not significantly alter epithelial integrity or barrier function. When apically challenged with viable Klebsiella pneumoniae, the cultured epithelia had an enhanced tightness which was unaffected by alcohol. Further, alcohol enhanced apical bacterial growth, but not bacterial binding to the cells. The cultured epithelium in the absence of any treatment or stimulation had a base-level IL-6 and IL-8 secretion. Apical bacterial challenge significantly elevated the basolateral secretion of inflammatory cytokines including IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IFN-γ, GM-CSF, and TNF-α. However, alcohol suppressed the observed cytokine burst in response to infection. Addition of adenosine receptor agonists negated the suppression of IL-6 and TNF-α. Thus, acute alcohol alters the epithelial cytokine response to infection, which can be partially mitigated by adenosine receptor agonists. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers 2013)

Review

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Open AccessReview Crosstalk between Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF) Receptor and Integrin through Direct Integrin Binding to FGF and Resulting Integrin-FGF-FGFR Ternary Complex Formation
Med. Sci. 2013, 1(1), 20-36; doi:10.3390/medsci1010020
Received: 13 June 2013 / Revised: 6 August 2013 / Accepted: 8 August 2013 / Published: 13 August 2013
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Abstract
Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) play a critical role in diverse physiological processes and the pathogenesis of diseases. Integrins are involved in FGF signaling, since integrin antagonists suppress FGF signaling. This is called integrin-FGF crosstalk, while the specifics of the crosstalk are unclear. [...] Read more.
Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) play a critical role in diverse physiological processes and the pathogenesis of diseases. Integrins are involved in FGF signaling, since integrin antagonists suppress FGF signaling. This is called integrin-FGF crosstalk, while the specifics of the crosstalk are unclear. This review highlights recent findings that FGF1 directly interacts with integrin αvβ3, and the resulting integrin-FGF-fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) ternary complex formation is essential for FGF1-induced cell proliferation, migration and angiogenesis. An integrin-binding defective FGF1 mutant (Arg-50 to Glu, R50E) is defective in ternary complex formation and in inducing cell proliferation, migration and angiogenesis, while R50E still binds to the FGF receptor and heparin. In addition, R50E suppressed tumorigenesis in vivo, while wild-type (WT) FGF1 enhanced it. Thus, the direct interaction between FGF1 and integrin αvβ3 is a potential therapeutic target, and R50E is a potential therapeutic agent. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers 2013)
Open AccessReview Cellular Immunotherapy: Using Alloreactivity to Induce Anti-Leukemic Responses without Prolonged Persistence of Donor Cells
Med. Sci. 2013, 1(1), 37-48; doi:10.3390/medsci1010037
Received: 29 September 2013 / Revised: 21 October 2013 / Accepted: 11 November 2013 / Published: 15 November 2013
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Abstract
A goal of cancer immunologists is to harness cellular immune responses to achieve anti-cancer responses. One of the strongest activating stimuli for the immune system is the encounter with cells expressing allogeneic HLA molecules. While alloreactive responses can negatively impact of the [...] Read more.
A goal of cancer immunologists is to harness cellular immune responses to achieve anti-cancer responses. One of the strongest activating stimuli for the immune system is the encounter with cells expressing allogeneic HLA molecules. While alloreactive responses can negatively impact of the outcome of hematopoietic stem cell transplant because of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), these same responses can have anti-leukemic effects. Donor lymphocyte infusions have been used in an attempt to harness alloreactive responses to achieve anti-leukemic responses. Because this protocol is usually carried out in the absence of recipient anti-donor responses, this protocol often induces GVHD as well as anti-leukemic responses. A recent study indicated the infusion of large number of haploidentical donor cells (1–2 × 108 CD3+ cells/kg) into patients with refractory hematological malignancies (100 cGy total body irradiation) resulted in 14 (7 major) responses/26 patients. A rapidly developing cytokine storm was observed, while no persisting donor cells could be detected at two weeks after infusion eliminating the possibility of GVHD. Characterization of the effector mechanisms responsible for the anti-leukemic responses in this protocol, should guide new approaches for achieving enhanced anti-leukemic responses using this protocol. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Cellular Immunotherapy)

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