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Geosciences 2018, 8(5), 185; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences8050185

Experimental Modelling of the Caprock/Cement Interface Behaviour under CO2 Storage Conditions: Effect of Water and Supercritical CO2 from a Cathodoluminescence Study

1
Laboratoire GeoRessources, Université de Lorraine, UMR 7359, BP 70239, 54506 Vandoeuvre lès Nancy, France
2
Mines Paristech, 35 rue Saint Honoré, 77305 Fontainebleau CEDEX, France
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 11 April 2018 / Revised: 9 May 2018 / Accepted: 15 May 2018 / Published: 18 May 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geological Storage of Gases as a Tool for Energy Transition)
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Abstract

In the framework of CO2 geological storage, one of the critical points leading to possible important CO2 leakage is the behaviour of the different interfaces between the rocks and the injection wells. This paper discussed the results from an experimental modelling of the evolution of a caprock/cement interface under high pressure and temperature conditions. Batch experiments were performed with a caprock (Callovo-Oxfordian claystone of the Paris Basin) in contact with a cement (Portland class G) in the presence of supercritical CO2 under dry or wet conditions. The mineralogical and mechanical evolution of the caprock, the Portland cement, and their interface submitted to the attack of carbonic acid either supercritical or dissolved in a saline water under geological conditions of pressure and temperature. This model should help to better understand the behaviour of interfaces in the proximal zone at the injection site and to prevent risks of leakage from this critical part of injection wells. After one month of ageing at 80 °C under 100 bar of CO2 pressure, the caprock, the cement, and the interface between the caprock and cement are investigated with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and cathodoluminescence (CL). The main results reveal (i) the influence of the alteration conditions: with dry CO2, the carbonation of the cement is more extended than under wet conditions; (ii) successive phases of carbonate precipitation (calcite and aragonite) responsible for the loss of mechanical cohesion of the interfaces; (iii) the mineralogical and chemical evolution of the cement which undergoes successive phases of carbonation and leaching; (iv) the limited reactivity of the clayey caprock despite the acidic attack of CO2; and (v) the influence of water on the transport mechanisms of dissolved species and thus on the location of mineral precipitations. View Full-Text
Keywords: CO2 storage; Portland cement; clays; caprock; interface; well integrity; high-pressure experiment CO2 storage; Portland cement; clays; caprock; interface; well integrity; high-pressure experiment
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
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Jobard, E.; Sterpenich, J.; Pironon, J.; Corvisier, J.; Randi, A. Experimental Modelling of the Caprock/Cement Interface Behaviour under CO2 Storage Conditions: Effect of Water and Supercritical CO2 from a Cathodoluminescence Study. Geosciences 2018, 8, 185.

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