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Animals 2018, 8(7), 117; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani8070117

Effect of Dietary Ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) and Multi-Strain Probiotic on Growth and Carcass Traits, Blood Biochemistry, Immune Responses and Intestinal Microflora in Broiler Chickens

1
Department of Animal Science, Rasht Branch, Islamic Azad University, Rasht 14536, Iran
2
Institute of Agriculture, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia
3
Departamento de Producción Agropecuaria, Universidad de La Frontera, Temuco 01145, Chile
4
Department of Agricultural and Environmental Science, University of Bari ‘Aldo Moro’, Bari 70125, Italy
5
Department of DETO, Section of Veterinary Science and Animal Production, University of Bari ‘Aldo Moro’, Valenzano, Bari 70010, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 29 May 2018 / Revised: 11 July 2018 / Accepted: 11 July 2018 / Published: 14 July 2018
(This article belongs to the Section Farm Animals)
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Simple Summary

In the last decade, there has been growing interest in the use of natural herbs and probiotics as alternatives to antibiotics in feeds to improve animal productivity and to maximize their potential output. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine the effect of different levels of ginger powder and a commercial multi-strain probiotic in the diet on broiler performance, immune response, microbiota, haematology and carcass characteristics. Based on findings, dietary supplementation with both ginger or probiotics showed significant influence on birds’ immune response, probably because ginger had strong antioxidant activity and the probiotics stimulated the production of natural antibodies.

Abstract

A total of 225 day-old male broiler chicks (Ross-308) were randomly allocated to five treatment groups, with three replicates in a completely randomized design for 42 days. Birds were fed a basal-diet supplemented with: no additive (control-diet), multi-strain probiotic (Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus casei, Enterococcus faecium and Bifidobacterium thermophilum), or 0.15, 0.20 and 0.25% ginger (Z. officinale) powder, respectively. The results show no significant differences among treatments for growth traits and carcass characteristics, whereas using probiotics and ginger at all levels resulted in a significant decrease of gizzard weight and abdominal fat compared to the control group. Dietary treatments did not affect blood biochemistry and antibody production against sheep red blood cells (SRBC), IgG and IgM; however, antibody titre was higher in birds fed 0.25% ginger than other diets after 7 days post injection. The Lactobacillus counts in ileal content of birds fed 0.20 and 0.25% ginger were higher compared to the other treatments. In conclusion, dietary supplementation with either ginger or probiotics showed a significant influence on birds’ immune response, probably because ginger had strong antioxidant activity and the probiotics stimulated the production of natural antibodies. View Full-Text
Keywords: medicinal plants; broiler; growth; blood parameters; immune system; intestinal microflora medicinal plants; broiler; growth; blood parameters; immune system; intestinal microflora
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
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Qorbanpour, M.; Fahim, T.; Javandel, F.; Nosrati, M.; Paz, E.; Seidavi, A.; Ragni, M.; Laudadio, V.; Tufarelli, V. Effect of Dietary Ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) and Multi-Strain Probiotic on Growth and Carcass Traits, Blood Biochemistry, Immune Responses and Intestinal Microflora in Broiler Chickens. Animals 2018, 8, 117.

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