Next Article in Journal
A Survey of Public Opinion on Cat (Felis catus) Predation and the Future Direction of Cat Management in New Zealand
Previous Article in Journal
ExNOTic: Should We Be Keeping Exotic Pets?
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Animals 2017, 7(7), 48; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani7070048

Factors that Influence Intake to One Municipal Animal Control Facility in Florida: A Qualitative Study

1
College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA
2
Colleges of Dentistry, Education, Veterinary Medicine, & Pharmacy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA
3
George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA
4
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA
5
College of Health & Human Performance, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA
6
College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 22 April 2017 / Revised: 21 June 2017 / Accepted: 25 June 2017 / Published: 30 June 2017
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [3755 KB, uploaded 30 June 2017]   |  

Abstract

This qualitative study identified a study area by visualizing one year of animal intake from a municipal animal shelter on geographic information systems (GIS) maps to select an area of high stray-dog intake to investigate. Researchers conducted semi-structured interviews with residents of the selected study area to elucidate why there were high numbers of stray dogs coming from this location. Using grounded theory, three themes emerged from the interviews: concerns, attitudes, and disparities. The residents expressed concerns about animal welfare, personal safety, money, and health. They held various attitudes toward domestic animals in the community, including viewing them as pets, pests, or useful commodities (products). Residents expressed acceptance as well as some anger and fear about the situation in their community. Interviewees revealed they faced multiple socioeconomic disparities related to poverty. Pet abandonment can result when pet owners must prioritize human needs over animal needs, leading to increased shelter intake of stray dogs. Community-specific strategies for reducing local animal shelter intake should address the issue of pet abandonment by simultaneously targeting veterinary needs of animals, socioeconomic needs of residents, and respecting attitude differences between residents and shelter professionals. View Full-Text
Keywords: animal shelters; GIS mapping; socioeconomic disparities; grounded theory; pet abandonment animal shelters; GIS mapping; socioeconomic disparities; grounded theory; pet abandonment
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Spencer, T.; Behar-Horenstein, L.; Aufmuth, J.; Hardt, N.; Applebaum, J.W.; Emanuel, A.; Isaza, N. Factors that Influence Intake to One Municipal Animal Control Facility in Florida: A Qualitative Study. Animals 2017, 7, 48.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Animals EISSN 2076-2615 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top