Next Article in Journal
Good Science, Good Sense and Good Sensibilities: The Three Ss of Carol Newton
Previous Article in Journal
Owners’ Perceptions of Their Animal’s Behavioural Response to the Loss of an Animal Companion
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessReview
Animals 2016, 6(11), 69; doi:10.3390/ani6110069

The Challenges of Using Horses for Practical Teaching Purposes in Veterinary Programmes

Massey Equine, Institute of Veterinary, Animal and Biomedical Sciences, Massey University, Private Bag 11-222, Palmerston North 4442, New Zealand
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Clive J. C. Phillips
Received: 10 August 2016 / Revised: 25 October 2016 / Accepted: 7 November 2016 / Published: 11 November 2016
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [512 KB, uploaded 11 November 2016]   |  

Simple Summary

Veterinary students often lack previous experience in handling horses and other large animals. This article discusses the challenges of using horses for veterinary teaching purposes and the potential consequences to student and equine welfare. The article proposes a conceptual model to optimise equine welfare, and subsequently student safety, during practical equine handling classes.

Abstract

Students enrolled in veterinary degrees often come from an urban background with little previous experience in handling horses and other large animals. Many veterinary degree programmes place importance on the teaching of appropriate equine handling skills, yet within the literature it is commonly reported that time allocated for practical classes often suffers due to time constraint pressure from other elements of the curriculum. The effect of this pressure on animal handling teaching time is reflected in the self-reported low level of animal handling competency, particularly equine, in students with limited prior experience with horses. This is a concern as a naive student is potentially at higher risk of injury to themselves when interacting with horses. Additionally, a naive student with limited understanding of equine behaviour may, through inconsistent or improper handling, increase the anxiety and compromise the welfare of these horses. There is a lack of literature investigating the welfare of horses in university teaching facilities, appropriate handling procedures, and student safety. This article focuses on the importance for students to be able to interpret equine behaviour and the potential consequences of poor handling skills to equine and student welfare. Lastly, the authors suggest a conceptual model to optimise equine welfare, and subsequently student safety, during practical equine handling classes. View Full-Text
Keywords: horse; equine handling; equine welfare; human-equine interaction horse; equine handling; equine welfare; human-equine interaction
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Gronqvist, G.; Rogers, C.; Gee, E.; Bolwell, C.; Gordon, S. The Challenges of Using Horses for Practical Teaching Purposes in Veterinary Programmes. Animals 2016, 6, 69.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Animals EISSN 2076-2615 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top