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Humanities 2017, 6(2), 12; doi:10.3390/h6020012

“I Do, I Don’t”: The Benefits and Perils of Legalizing Same-Sex Marriage in the United States—One Year Later

1
Master of Health Care Delivery Science at Dartmouth, 37 Dewey Field Road, Hanover, NH 03755-7253, USA
2
The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Research, 1 Medical Center Drive, Lebanon, NH 03766, USA
3
Department of Public Health, School of Nursing and Health Professions, McKean 380, Colby-Sawyer College, New London, NH 03257, USA
Academic Editors: Annabel Martín and Gail Finney
Received: 14 February 2017 / Revised: 7 March 2017 / Accepted: 22 March 2017 / Published: 30 March 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gender in Times of Crisis: A Multidisciplinary Conversation)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [248 KB, uploaded 30 March 2017]

Abstract

In 1970, a gay male couple applied for and was given a marriage license in Minnesota. The license was eventually rescinded by court order. Forty-five years later, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that Section 3 of the Defense of Marriage Act, limiting the federal definition of marriage to consist of one man and one woman, was unconstitutional. The result was the legalization of same-sex marriage in the United States. The purpose of this article is to discuss the importance of establishing the right for same-sex couples to legally marry. It outlines the benefits and costs to LGBT communities one year after the establishment of same-sex marriage in the U.S. This paper explores the limits of utilizing a rights-based approach when advocating social change. The recommendation is for LGBT individuals, communities and allies to shift tactics to adopt a capabilities approach to organizing and mobilizing people, groups, and organizations around issues of injustice. A capabilities framework addresses the complexities of individual and community needs while providing a foundation for coalition building and lasting positive social change. View Full-Text
Keywords: same-sex marriage; LGBT marriage; social movement; social change; gay marriage same-sex marriage; LGBT marriage; social movement; social change; gay marriage
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Wolff, K.B. “I Do, I Don’t”: The Benefits and Perils of Legalizing Same-Sex Marriage in the United States—One Year Later. Humanities 2017, 6, 12.

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