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Humanities, Volume 5, Issue 4 (December 2016)

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial The Fairy Tale and Its Uses in Contemporary New Media and Popular Culture Introduction
Humanities 2016, 5(4), 81; doi:10.3390/h5040081
Received: 13 September 2016 / Revised: 19 September 2016 / Accepted: 19 September 2016 / Published: 27 September 2016
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Abstract
Ever since the beginning of the 21st century, the fairy tale has not only become a staple of the small and silver screen around the globe, it has also migrated into new media, overwhelming audiences with imaginative and spectacular retellings along the way.
[...] Read more.
Ever since the beginning of the 21st century, the fairy tale has not only become a staple of the small and silver screen around the globe, it has also migrated into new media, overwhelming audiences with imaginative and spectacular retellings along the way. Indeed, modern fairy-tale adaptations pervading contemporary popular culture drastically subvert, shatter, and alter the public’s understanding of the classic fairy tale. Because of the phenomenally increasing proliferation of fairy-tale transformations in today’s “old” and “new” media, we must reflect upon the significance of the fairy tale for society and its social uses in a nuanced fashion. How, why, and for whom have fairy-tale narratives, characters, and motifs metamorphosed in recent decades? What significant intermedial and intertextual relationships exist nowadays in connection with the fairy tale? This special issue features 11 illuminating articles of 13 scholars in the fields of folklore and fairy-tale studies tackling these and other relevant questions. Full article
Open AccessEditorial Special Issue Introduction “Transcultural Literary Studies: Politics, Theory, and Literary Analysis”
Humanities 2016, 5(4), 86; doi:10.3390/h5040086
Received: 2 November 2016 / Revised: 21 November 2016 / Accepted: 21 November 2016 / Published: 21 December 2016
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Research

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Open AccessArticle Post What? Disarticulating Post-Discourses in Toni Morrison’s God Help the Child
Humanities 2016, 5(4), 80; doi:10.3390/h5040080
Received: 15 June 2016 / Revised: 14 September 2016 / Accepted: 19 September 2016 / Published: 27 September 2016
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Abstract
In the midst of the proliferation of post-discourses, this essay investigates how Toni Morrison’s God Help the Child (2015) offers a timely exploration of the hurting Black female body that calls into question, if not outright refutes, whether Americans have entered a post-racial,
[...] Read more.
In the midst of the proliferation of post-discourses, this essay investigates how Toni Morrison’s God Help the Child (2015) offers a timely exploration of the hurting Black female body that calls into question, if not outright refutes, whether Americans have entered a post-racial, post-Black, and post-feminist era. This essay opens with a critical context section that situates God Help the Child within and against post-discourses, before examining how resemblances with Morrison’s prior works like Beloved (1987) and The Bluest Eye (1970) confirm that the legacy of slavery still dictates the way Black female bodies are seen and treated in twenty-first-century America. Ultimately, what this study intends is to speak the unspeakable: race still matters despite the silencing effects of post-discourses. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Race, Politics, and the Humanities in an Age of 'Posts')
Open AccessArticle Animal Autobiography; Or, Narration beyond the Human
Humanities 2016, 5(4), 82; doi:10.3390/h5040082
Received: 10 August 2016 / Revised: 11 October 2016 / Accepted: 13 October 2016 / Published: 18 October 2016
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Abstract
In engaging with acts of self-narration that cross species lines, creators of animal autobiographies also broach questions about genre, truth status, and the structure as well as the politics of narrative representation. To address these questions, the present article draws not just on
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In engaging with acts of self-narration that cross species lines, creators of animal autobiographies also broach questions about genre, truth status, and the structure as well as the politics of narrative representation. To address these questions, the present article draws not just on scholarship on (animal) autobiography but also on ideas from the fields of linguistic semantics, politeness theory, and discourse analysis, including the “framing and footing” approach that focuses on talk emerging in contexts of face-to-face interaction and that derives most directly from the work of Erving Goffman. On the basis of this research, and using case studies that range from animal riddles to Ceridwen Dovey’s Only the Animals (2014), a collection of life stories posthumously narrated by a variety of nonhuman tellers, I profile autobiographical acts that reach beyond the human as ways of speaking for or in behalf of animal others. Some animal autobiographies correlate with acts of telling for which humans themselves remain the principals as well as authors; their animal animators remain relegated to the role of commenting on human institutions, values, practices, and artifacts. Other examples, however, can be read as co-authored acts of narrating in behalf of equally hybrid (or “humanimal”) principals. These experiments with narration beyond the human afford solidarity-building projections of other creatures’ ways of being-in-the-world—projections that enable a reassessment, in turn, of forms of human being. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Animal Narratology)
Open AccessArticle Narrating Animal Trauma in Bulgakov and Tolstoy
Humanities 2016, 5(4), 84; doi:10.3390/h5040084
Received: 5 October 2016 / Revised: 6 November 2016 / Accepted: 8 November 2016 / Published: 15 November 2016
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Abstract
Following the recent “animal turn” in literary studies, which has inspired scholars to revisit traditional human-centered interpretations of texts narrated by animals, this article focuses on the convergence of animal studies and trauma theory. It offers new animal-centered close readings of Tolstoy’s Strider
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Following the recent “animal turn” in literary studies, which has inspired scholars to revisit traditional human-centered interpretations of texts narrated by animals, this article focuses on the convergence of animal studies and trauma theory. It offers new animal-centered close readings of Tolstoy’s Strider and Bulgakov’s Heart of a Dog, paying attention to animal pain rather than seeing it, and the text as a whole, as an allegory of human society. Like many other authors of literary fiction featuring animal narrators, Tolstoy and Bulgakov employ a kind of empathic ventriloquism to narrate animal pain, an important project which, however, given the status of both the animal and trauma outside human language, and thus susceptible to being distorted by it, produces inauthentic discourse (animal-like, rather than animal narration); therefore, these authors get closest to animal pain, not through sophisticated narration, but through the use of ellipses and onomatopoeia. Ultimately, any narratological difficulty with animal focalization is minor compared to the ethical imperative of anti-speciesist animal-standpoint criticism, and the goal is to reconceive the status of animals in literature so as to change their ontological place in the world, urging that this critical work and animal rights advocacy be continued in the classroom. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Animal Narratology)

Review

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Open AccessReview Complexes Tickling the $ubject
Humanities 2016, 5(4), 85; doi:10.3390/h5040085
Received: 19 September 2016 / Revised: 7 November 2016 / Accepted: 11 November 2016 / Published: 16 November 2016
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Abstract
This article continues my earlier work of reading Jung with Lacan. This article will develop Zizek’s work on Lacan’s concept of objet petit a by relating it to a phenomenological interpretation of Jung. I use a number of different examples, including Zizek’s interpretation
[...] Read more.
This article continues my earlier work of reading Jung with Lacan. This article will develop Zizek’s work on Lacan’s concept of objet petit a by relating it to a phenomenological interpretation of Jung. I use a number of different examples, including Zizek’s interpretation of Francis Bacon, Edvard Munch, Hans Holbein and Johann Gottlieb Fichte, to describe the objet petit a and its relationship to a phenomenological interpretation of complexes. By integrating other Lacanian concepts, such as subject, drive, fantasy, jouissance, gaze, desire, and ego as well as the imaginary, symbolic and Real, this work also highlights how Hegel and Heidegger can elucidate the relationship between objet petit a and complexes. Jung’s transcendent function and the Rosarium Philosophorum also elucidate the relationship between Jung and Lacan. Full article
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Other

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Open AccessCorrection Correction: Ana Pais. “Re-Affecting the Stage: Affective Resonance as the Function of the Audience.” Humanities 5 (2016): 79
Humanities 2016, 5(4), 83; doi:10.3390/h5040083
Received: 2 November 2016 / Revised: 3 November 2016 / Accepted: 3 November 2016 / Published: 8 November 2016
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Abstract The author wishes to make the following correction to the paper published in Humanities [1].[...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emotions and Affect in the Humanities, Creative Arts, and Performance)

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