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Humanities 2016, 5(2), 38; doi:10.3390/h5020038

The Arts of Energy: Between Hoping for the Stars and Despairing in the Detritus

Faculty of Art & Design, University of New South Wales, Sydney NSW 2021, Australia
Academic Editor: Adam Sweeting
Received: 27 December 2015 / Revised: 14 March 2016 / Accepted: 13 May 2016 / Published: 3 June 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Energy Use and the Humanities)
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Abstract

Fossil fueled energy production and consumption are the basis of global industrialised societies, with the deleterious biophysical effects of such production and consumption also forming the basis of the advent of Anthropocene. In the context of science and environmental policy, hope denotes rapid decarbonisation across the globe. Meanwhile, in art and the humanities, the study of such energy and decarbonisation remains nascent and nebulous. To account for these discrepancies, this article outlines the scale of the biophysical challenges by first establishing the relationship between outspoken climate scientists and international organisations determining climate and energy policy. This relationship—between marginalised and mainstream—is used to frame the analogous challenges for two cultural fields that have recently emerged in direct response: energy humanities and the arts of energy. The discussion centers on the challenge common to all fields—between the outspoken marginal and the orthodox mainstream—to speculate on how the arts of energy may recalibrate a context-contingent hope for energy futures, drawing on case studies of ISEA Bright Future and Facing Futures Free From Fear, two installations simultaneously staged by the author in 2013 about the relationship between energy and climate change. View Full-Text
Keywords: energy; energy humanities; renewable energy; fossil fuels; climate change; Anthropocene; art; climatology; space exploration energy; energy humanities; renewable energy; fossil fuels; climate change; Anthropocene; art; climatology; space exploration
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Wodak, J. The Arts of Energy: Between Hoping for the Stars and Despairing in the Detritus. Humanities 2016, 5, 38.

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