Next Article in Journal
The Determinants and Outcomes of Absence Behavior: A Systematic Literature Review
Next Article in Special Issue
The Geography of Economic Segregation
Previous Article in Journal
Economic Impact of Development Initiatives on Low-Income Households in Kelantan, Malaysia
Previous Article in Special Issue
Accounting for Demography and Preferences: New Estimates of Residential Segregation with Minimum Segregation Measures
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Soc. Sci. 2018, 7(8), 119; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci7080119

Racial/Ethnic Residential Segregation, the Distribution of Physician’s Offices and Access to Health Care: The Case of Houston, Texas

Department of Sociology, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-3012, USA
Received: 11 June 2018 / Revised: 10 July 2018 / Accepted: 16 July 2018 / Published: 24 July 2018
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [2529 KB, uploaded 24 July 2018]   |  

Abstract

Previous research has demonstrated the impacts of racial/ethnic residential segregation on access to health care, but little work has been conducted to tease out the mechanisms at play. I posit that the distribution of health care facilities may contribute to poor access to health care. In a study of the Houston area, I examine the association between residential segregation, the distribution of physician’s offices, and two health care access outcomes of having a personal physician, as well as the travel time to their office location. Using the 2010 Health of Houston Survey combined with several census products, I test these relationships in a series of spatial and multilevel models. I find that Black segregation is related to a lower density of physician’s offices. However, I find that this distribution is not related to having a personal physician, but is related to travel times, with a greater number of facilities leading to shorter travel times to the doctor. I also find that Black segregation is positively associated with travel times, and that the distribution of physician’s offices partially mediates this relationship. In sum, these findings suggest that a more equitable provision of health care resources across urban neighborhoods would mitigate some of the negative effects of segregation. View Full-Text
Keywords: residential segregation; race/ethnicity; health care; primary care; urban sociology residential segregation; race/ethnicity; health care; primary care; urban sociology
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Anderson, K.F. Racial/Ethnic Residential Segregation, the Distribution of Physician’s Offices and Access to Health Care: The Case of Houston, Texas. Soc. Sci. 2018, 7, 119.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Soc. Sci. EISSN 2076-0760 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top