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Soc. Sci. 2017, 6(4), 131; doi:10.3390/socsci6040131

Transnationalism among Second-Generation Muslim Americans: Being and Belonging in Their Transnational Social Field

Department of Sociology, Temple University, 1801 N. Broad Street, Philadelphia, PA 19122, USA
Received: 15 June 2017 / Revised: 20 October 2017 / Accepted: 25 October 2017 / Published: 30 October 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Understanding Muslim Mobilities and Gender)
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Abstract

An increase in transnationalism, the ability of individuals and families to travel and maintain relationships across national borders, has led to questions about its impact on identity especially for the children of migrants. When combined with concerns about global and national security such as those that are associated with Muslims and Islam, then questions about the strength national identity are particularly pertinent. This analysis uses the theories of transnational social fields and intersectionality to examine the transnational experiences of second-generation Muslim Americans. It relies on qualitative interview data. The data show the intersection of their national, religious, and gender identities. It demonstrates that they experience transnational being in their parents’ country of origin and belonging in the United States. Nationality, religion, and gender influence what they experience in each location. The analysis demonstrates the stability and centrality of American national identity in what second-generation Muslims experience in both locations. Moreover, their belonging in the United States rests squarely on their perceptions of themselves as Americans and their construction of their Muslim identity as an American religious identity. View Full-Text
Keywords: transnationalism; second generation; Muslim Americans; being; belonging; social fields transnationalism; second generation; Muslim Americans; being; belonging; social fields
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Byng, M. Transnationalism among Second-Generation Muslim Americans: Being and Belonging in Their Transnational Social Field. Soc. Sci. 2017, 6, 131.

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