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Soc. Sci. 2016, 5(4), 58; doi:10.3390/socsci5040058

Support for Protests in Latin America: Classifications and the Role of Online Networking

1
School of Journalism, College of Communication Arts and Sciences, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA
2
Department of Journalism & Electronic Media, College of Media & Communication, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409, USA
3
School of Journalism, Moody College of Communication, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA
4
Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Martin J. Bull
Received: 30 June 2016 / Revised: 26 August 2016 / Accepted: 18 September 2016 / Published: 28 September 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Social Media and Political Participation)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [1831 KB, uploaded 28 September 2016]   |  

Abstract

In recent years, Latin Americans marched the streets in a wave of protests that swept almost every country in the region. Yet few studies have assessed how Latin Americans support various forms of protest, and how new technologies affect attitudes toward protest tactics. Using data from the Latin American Public Opinion Project (N = 37,102), cluster analyses grouped citizens into four distinct groups depending on their support for protests. Most Latin Americans support moderate forms of protest, rejecting more radical tactics. Online networking is associated with support for both moderate and radical protests. But those who support only moderate protests use online networking sites more than Latin Americans as a whole, while those who support radical protests use online networking sites significantly less. Our findings suggest that only peaceful and legal demonstrations have been normalized in the region, and online networking foments support for moderate protest tactics. View Full-Text
Keywords: social movements; online networking; support for protests; Latin America; political communication social movements; online networking; support for protests; Latin America; political communication
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MDPI and ACS Style

Mourão, R.R.; Saldaña, M.; McGregor, S.C.; Zeh, A.D. Support for Protests in Latin America: Classifications and the Role of Online Networking. Soc. Sci. 2016, 5, 58.

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