Next Article in Journal / Special Issue
“Under His Spell”: Victims’ Perspectives of Being Groomed Online
Previous Article in Journal
On the Design of Social Media for Learning
Previous Article in Special Issue
Vulnerable Family Meetings: A Way of Promoting Team Working in GPs’ Everyday Responses to Child Maltreatment?
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Soc. Sci. 2014, 3(3), 394-403; doi:10.3390/socsci3030394

The Relationship between “Protection of” and “Violence Against” Infants and Young Children: The U.S. Experience, 1940–2005

1,†,* and 2,†
1
Department of Neurology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506, USA
2
Department of Statistics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506, USA
These authors contributed equally to this work.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 6 June 2014 / Revised: 24 July 2014 / Accepted: 5 August 2014 / Published: 12 August 2014
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Contemporary Developments in Child Protection)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [194 KB, uploaded 12 August 2014]   |  

Abstract

Between 1940 and 2005, in the United States, the rate of unnatural death declined about 75 percent in infant and young child boys and girls; a remarkable indicator of successful child protection. During this same period, the rate of reported homicide in infant boys increased 64.0 percent, in infant girls increased 43.5 percent, in young child boys increased 333.3 percent, and in young child girls increased 300.0 percent, a dismal and disturbing indicator of failed child protection. Can these simultaneously encouraging and discouraging observations be reconciled? The four categories of unnatural death, homicide, suicide, motor vehicle accident (MVA), and non-MVA, are mutually exclusive classifications. Correlations between the four categories of unnatural death among U.S. men and woman in all age groups for the years 1940 through 2005 were calculated. A negative correlation between homicide and non-MVA death rates was shown for all age groups, encompassing the entire human lifespan, in both genders. This consistently observed negative correlation was only observed between homicide and non-MVA death rates, and was not demonstrated between other causes of unnatural deaths. Moreover, this negative correlation was strongest (less than −0.7) in infants and young children. These observations are consistent with the suggestion that as the rate of unnatural death in infants and young children dramatically declined, society gave greater scrutiny to those fewer occurring unnatural deaths and demonstrated an increasing propensity to assign blame for those fewer deaths. View Full-Text
Keywords: child protection; child abuse; child homicide; infant protection; infant abuse; infant homicide; social surveillance; unnatural death child protection; child abuse; child homicide; infant protection; infant abuse; infant homicide; social surveillance; unnatural death
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 3.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Riggs, J.E.; Hobbs, G.R. The Relationship between “Protection of” and “Violence Against” Infants and Young Children: The U.S. Experience, 1940–2005. Soc. Sci. 2014, 3, 394-403.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Soc. Sci. EISSN 2076-0760 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top