Next Issue
Previous Issue

Table of Contents

Arts, Volume 3, Issue 1 (March 2014), Pages 1-189

  • Issues are regarded as officially published after their release is announced to the table of contents alert mailing list.
  • You may sign up for e-mail alerts to receive table of contents of newly released issues.
  • PDF is the official format for papers published in both, html and pdf forms. To view the papers in pdf format, click on the "PDF Full-text" link, and use the free Adobe Readerexternal link to open them.
View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-12
Export citation of selected articles as:

Editorial

Jump to: Research, Review, Other

Open AccessEditorial Acknowledgement to Reviewers of Arts in 2013
Arts 2014, 3(1), 116-117; doi:10.3390/arts3010116
Received: 24 February 2014 / Accepted: 24 February 2014 / Published: 24 February 2014
PDF Full-text (117 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract The editors of Arts would like to express their sincere gratitude to the following reviewers for assessing manuscripts in 2013. [...] Full article

Research

Jump to: Editorial, Review, Other

Open AccessArticle Amerindian Cosmologies and European Prehistoric Cave Art: Reasons for and Usefulness of a Comparison
Arts 2014, 3(1), 1-14; doi:10.3390/arts3010001
Received: 28 October 2013 / Revised: 2 December 2013 / Accepted: 17 December 2013 / Published: 27 December 2013
PDF Full-text (71 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Several anthropological studies conducted in recent years among different Native American cultures have revealed a series of common features in ontological premises and cosmological frameworks. These features seem to be shared by most of the Native peoples in both North and South America.
[...] Read more.
Several anthropological studies conducted in recent years among different Native American cultures have revealed a series of common features in ontological premises and cosmological frameworks. These features seem to be shared by most of the Native peoples in both North and South America. They include: a system of relationships between humans and non-human beings based on an ontology “of persons” as contrasted to the ontology “of things” typical of the Western attitude towards Nature; a structure of the cosmos made by superposed layers, which express the idea of a reality represented as comprising hidden dimensions and invisible domains; and the key role played by ecstatic practitioners in establishing relationships with and acquiring knowledge from these multiple dimensions of the universe. Here, the idea is suggested that these elements could be profitably utilized to interpret the meaning of Paleolithic cave art, not simply implying a series of typological likenesses, but suggesting the possibility of historic (pre-historic) links. It should be remembered that the main settlement of the Americas occurred in a period (from 30,000–20,000 years B.P.) which is contemporaneous with the creation of the masterworks in the caves of France and Spain. Full article
(This article belongs to the collection World Rock Art)
Open AccessArticle Toward an A Priori Sustainable Architecture
Arts 2014, 3(1), 15-26; doi:10.3390/arts3010015
Received: 27 October 2013 / Revised: 2 December 2013 / Accepted: 17 December 2013 / Published: 3 January 2014
PDF Full-text (1261 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
After decades of belief in the principles that man has absolute dominion over nature, and thus, in the separation of natural and anthropic processes, humanity is at the beginning of a new era characterized by the search for a renewed pact between man
[...] Read more.
After decades of belief in the principles that man has absolute dominion over nature, and thus, in the separation of natural and anthropic processes, humanity is at the beginning of a new era characterized by the search for a renewed pact between man and the environment. This search has yielded new terminology to indicate sustainable ways of transforming the anthropic environment: zero-energy development, bioclimatic architecture, eco-buildings and low carbon footprint. Apparently, this new linguistic phenomenon is symptomatic of two trends: firstly, of a sort of amnesia, in the sense that traditional architecture was already sustainable, not out of choice, but out of survival needs (via its ties to local climate and materials); and secondly, of an identity crisis among designers caused by the difficulty in finding specific boundaries for the discipline of architecture and urban design. Reflecting on these aspects and through the description of two recent projects, this article addresses the renewed interest in re-establishing an inseparable relationship between natural and anthropic processes. The goal is to elucidate a localized form of sustainability by recovering and upgrading traditional knowledge. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Architecture)
Open AccessArticle Archaeological Investigations at a Wisconsin Petroglyph Site
Arts 2014, 3(1), 27-45; doi:10.3390/arts3010027
Received: 30 September 2013 / Revised: 28 October 2013 / Accepted: 1 December 2013 / Published: 3 January 2014
PDF Full-text (3378 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Preliminary test excavations at the Hensler Petroglyph Site in East Central Wisconsin, U.S.A. have disclosed the remains of aboriginal engravings below Aeolian sediments dated to ca. 15,000 years B.P. The stratified deposits lying adjacent to an engraved panel, containing 35 pecked images,
[...] Read more.
Preliminary test excavations at the Hensler Petroglyph Site in East Central Wisconsin, U.S.A. have disclosed the remains of aboriginal engravings below Aeolian sediments dated to ca. 15,000 years B.P. The stratified deposits lying adjacent to an engraved panel, containing 35 pecked images, have yielded animal-like cobbles, some covered with red ochre, apparently picked for some esoteric use. The site itself has unusual natural shapes in the rock formation, along with acoustical properties, lightning strikes, a magnetic anomaly, and geographic prominence. Collectively these factors are thought to have attracted the ancient rock artists to the site. Full article
(This article belongs to the collection World Rock Art)
Open AccessArticle Dating Petroglyphs from Fugoppe Cave, Japan
Arts 2014, 3(1), 46-53; doi:10.3390/arts3010046
Received: 9 September 2013 / Revised: 8 January 2014 / Accepted: 13 January 2014 / Published: 20 January 2014
PDF Full-text (955 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
For over 20 years, I have tried to establish a relative date for petroglyphs in Fugoppe Cave, Japan. Unsuspected amidst debris accumulating from about 1300 years ago, the petroglyphs were rediscovered accidentally in 1950. From an analysis of petroglyphs on fallen rocks scattered
[...] Read more.
For over 20 years, I have tried to establish a relative date for petroglyphs in Fugoppe Cave, Japan. Unsuspected amidst debris accumulating from about 1300 years ago, the petroglyphs were rediscovered accidentally in 1950. From an analysis of petroglyphs on fallen rocks scattered randomly on the site floor, I argue that the artworks date from ca.1900 years ago. The cave itself, formed by wave action, saw its main occupation by pottery-making people from 1700–1500 years ago; although the petroglyphs on the rock walls predated their occupation, it seems unlikely that the occupants attached any meaning to them. Full article
(This article belongs to the collection World Rock Art)
Open AccessArticle Rock Art Research in Southeast Asia: A Synthesis
Arts 2014, 3(1), 73-104; doi:10.3390/arts3010073
Received: 4 October 2013 / Revised: 29 January 2014 / Accepted: 29 January 2014 / Published: 13 February 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1236 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Rock art has been known in Southeast Asia since the early 19th century, but relatively little attention has been paid to this class of archaeological material. This paper attempts to correct the perception that there is little rock art known in the region;
[...] Read more.
Rock art has been known in Southeast Asia since the early 19th century, but relatively little attention has been paid to this class of archaeological material. This paper attempts to correct the perception that there is little rock art known in the region; especially in the light of intensified research efforts over the last 30 years that have led to the discovery of numerous new sites. Over a thousand rock art sites are known in the form of rock paintings, petroglyphs and megaliths in Southeast Asia, and their distribution across the various territories are uneven. This paper summarises the state of rock art research in Southeast Asia and discusses some of the challenges of studying rock art in this region, research trends and new finds from recent research. Full article
(This article belongs to the collection World Rock Art)
Figures

Open AccessArticle The Rock Paintings of Kuh-e-Donbeh in Esfahan, Central Iran
Arts 2014, 3(1), 118-134; doi:10.3390/arts3010118
Received: 17 January 2014 / Revised: 6 February 2014 / Accepted: 18 February 2014 / Published: 26 February 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (2071 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Although a great number of petroglyphs have been identified in Iran, only a few rock painting sites have been found. Despite this, a considerable number of rock paintings have been discovered in Kuh-e-Donbeh, which is a mountain located to the south-west of the
[...] Read more.
Although a great number of petroglyphs have been identified in Iran, only a few rock painting sites have been found. Despite this, a considerable number of rock paintings have been discovered in Kuh-e-Donbeh, which is a mountain located to the south-west of the city of Esfahan in central Iran. The paintings can be found on the rims of seasonal water channels on this mountain. All the depictions are painted with red pigment sourced from the immediate region. The motifs depicted include zoomorphs, anthropomorphs, horse-riding scenes, and some unknown shapes, etc. A farming theme is also prevalent in the corpus. The paintings are located in five areas and, in some cases, have been subject to intense weathering.  Some of the rock paintings may date to the historic period, but reliable dating is not currently possible. So, analysis of the pigments for more secure scientific dating will be required. Full article
(This article belongs to the collection World Rock Art)
Open AccessArticle Learning from Mardin and Cumalıkızık: Turkish Vernacular Architecture in the Context of Sustainability
Arts 2014, 3(1), 175-189; doi:10.3390/arts3010175
Received: 2 January 2014 / Revised: 25 February 2014 / Accepted: 25 February 2014 / Published: 10 March 2014
PDF Full-text (586 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The criterion of sustainable design today ranks among the most important factors influencing architectural design, and the contributions of sustainability to architectural design are steadily increasing in parallel with developments in technology and material science. Although sustainability seems to be a new concept,
[...] Read more.
The criterion of sustainable design today ranks among the most important factors influencing architectural design, and the contributions of sustainability to architectural design are steadily increasing in parallel with developments in technology and material science. Although sustainability seems to be a new concept, the subject, in reality, is not. Much of contemporary architecture depends on references to traditional architecture in its development, and there are many examples of sustainable architecture found in different parts of the world to which architects can refer. Turkey is one of these countries and it has a variety of traditional housing cultures that have developed with their own unique characteristics. This paper uses two examples that are very different from each other to investigate the traces of sustainable design criteria in Turkey’s traditional housing architecture. One of the investigated locations is in Cumalikizik, while the other is located in Mardin. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Architecture)

Review

Jump to: Editorial, Research, Other

Open AccessReview Destroy…Alexander Iolas: The Villa-Museum and the Relics of a Lost Collection
Arts 2014, 3(1), 105-115; doi:10.3390/arts3010105
Received: 10 December 2013 / Revised: 14 January 2014 / Accepted: 5 February 2014 / Published: 14 February 2014
PDF Full-text (603 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract The paper comments on the event Destroy…Alexander Iolas held on the occasion of the re-edition of Iolas’ biography, 25 years after the collector’s death. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Exhibition Studies)
Open AccessReview Palaeoart at Two Million Years Ago? A Review of the Evidence
Arts 2014, 3(1), 135-155; doi:10.3390/arts3010135
Received: 29 September 2013 / Revised: 22 November 2013 / Accepted: 26 November 2013 / Published: 28 February 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (463 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Current archaeological evidence supports the claim that symbolic behavior, including palaeoart, first emerged in human evolution around 1 million years ago. The purpose of this article is to review archaeological studies that might support the hypothesis that the earliest palaeoart actually is evident
[...] Read more.
Current archaeological evidence supports the claim that symbolic behavior, including palaeoart, first emerged in human evolution around 1 million years ago. The purpose of this article is to review archaeological studies that might support the hypothesis that the earliest palaeoart actually is evident around 2 million years ago. This review identifies nine Oldowan artifacts that have been proposed as possible non-utilitarian and possibly symbolic behavior. Among seven stone tools, the three strongest candidates are the Olduvai Gorge, the FLK North grooved and pecked cobble, ~1.80 million years ago, and MNK Main subspheroid with hexagon shape framing an apparent natural dot-and-undulating-line motif, ~1.5–1.6 million years ago, both initially reported and described by Mary Leakey; and the curated Koobi Fora FxJj1 “broken core” with inner rhomboid shape, ~1.87 million years ago. All six stone tools from Olduvai Gorge need scientific re-examination to determine their chaîne opératoire and assess non-utilitarian features. If even one of the Olduvai Gorge artifacts were validated as symbolic behavior this would indicate the emergence of palaeoart one million years earlier than current proposals. It would also suggest that Homo habilis/rudolfensis or a very early Homo erectus had substantially more advanced cognitive, design and symbolic competencies than inferred in current theories. It would constitute a challenge to develop more advanced cognitive semiotic and art-theoretic analytical tools for illuminating the role of such palaeoart in hominin cultural evolution. Full article
(This article belongs to the collection World Rock Art)
Open AccessReview Pleistocene Paleoart of Australia
Arts 2014, 3(1), 156-174; doi:10.3390/arts3010156
Received: 1 February 2014 / Accepted: 7 February 2014 / Published: 28 February 2014
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (833 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Pleistocene rock art is abundant in Australia, but has so far received only limited attention. Instead there has been a trend, begun over a century ago, to search for presumed depictions of extinct megafauna and the tracks of such species. All these notions
[...] Read more.
Pleistocene rock art is abundant in Australia, but has so far received only limited attention. Instead there has been a trend, begun over a century ago, to search for presumed depictions of extinct megafauna and the tracks of such species. All these notions have been discredited, however, and the current evidence suggests that figurative depiction was introduced only during the Holocene, never reaching Tasmania. Nevertheless, some Australian rock art has been attributed to the Pleistocene by direct dating methods, and its nature implies that a significant portion of the surviving corpus of rock art may also be of such age. In particular much of Australian cave art is of the Ice Age, or appears to be so, and any heavily weathered or patinated petroglyphs on particularly hard rocks are good candidates for Pleistocene antiquity. On the other hand, there is very limited evidence of mobiliary paleoart of such age in Australia. Full article
(This article belongs to the collection World Rock Art)

Other

Jump to: Editorial, Research, Review

Open AccessEssay Tracey Emin: Life Made Art, Art Made from Life
Arts 2014, 3(1), 54-72; doi:10.3390/arts3010054
Received: 9 October 2013 / Revised: 28 January 2014 / Accepted: 29 January 2014 / Published: 12 February 2014
PDF Full-text (822 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Tracey Emin is one of the best- known current British artists. Her art is essentially autobiographical. The major aim of the present essay is to analyze Emin’s artist work and to study her artistic references. To fulfill this goal, biographic references, linked to
[...] Read more.
Tracey Emin is one of the best- known current British artists. Her art is essentially autobiographical. The major aim of the present essay is to analyze Emin’s artist work and to study her artistic references. To fulfill this goal, biographic references, linked to her artistic work, are mentioned and her topics, obsessions, procedures, and techniques are reviewed, with a special mention to the central role of words in her art. Full article

Journal Contact

MDPI AG
Arts Editorial Office
St. Alban-Anlage 66, 4052 Basel, Switzerland
arts@mdpi.com
Tel. +41 61 683 77 34
Fax: +41 61 302 89 18
Editorial Board
Contact Details Submit to Arts
Back to Top