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Buildings 2018, 8(8), 113; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings8080113

Using Network Analysis and BIM to Quantify the Impact of Design for Disassembly

1
BATir Building, Architecture & Town planning, Ecole polytechnique de Bruxelles, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels 1050, Belgium
2
Department of Architectural Engineering, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels 1050, Belgium
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 7 July 2018 / Revised: 10 August 2018 / Accepted: 15 August 2018 / Published: 18 August 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Building Sustainability Assessment)
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Abstract

Design for Disassembly (DfD) is a promising design strategy to improve resource efficiency in buildings. To facilitate its application in design and construction practice, specific assessment tools are currently being developed. By reviewing the literature on DfD, including criteria and assessment methods, and with an explorative research approach on simple examples, we have developed a new method called Disassembly Network Analysis (DNA) to quantify the impact of DfD and link it to specific design improvements. The impact of DfD is measured in material flows generated during the disassembly of a building element. The DNA method uses network analysis and Building Information Modeling to deliver information about flows of recovered and lost materials and disassembly time. This paper presents the DNA method and two illustrative examples. Although DNA is still at a preliminary stage of development, it already shows the potential to compare assemblies and supports better-informed decisions during the design process by detecting potential points of improvements regarding waste generation and time needed to disassemble an element. View Full-Text
Keywords: Design for Disassembly (DfD); Building Information Modeling (BIM); network analysis (NA); assessment tool; material flows Design for Disassembly (DfD); Building Information Modeling (BIM); network analysis (NA); assessment tool; material flows
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Denis, F.; Vandervaeren, C.; De Temmerman, N. Using Network Analysis and BIM to Quantify the Impact of Design for Disassembly. Buildings 2018, 8, 113.

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