Next Article in Journal
Assumptions of Decision-Making Capacity: The Role Supporter Attitudes Play in the Realisation of Article 12 for People with Severe or Profound Intellectual Disability
Next Article in Special Issue
Precision Medicine and Advancing Genetic Technologies—Disability and Human Rights Perspectives
Previous Article in Journal
Explaining Patterns of Urban Violence in Medellin, Colombia
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Laws 2016, 5(1), 5; doi:10.3390/laws5010005

CRISPR, a Crossroads in Genetic Intervention: Pitting the Right to Health against the Right to Disability

Center for Research on Ethical, Legal and Social Implications of Psychiatric, Neurologic & Behavioral Genetics, Columbia University, 1051 Riverside Drive, New York, NY 10032, USA
Academic Editor: Maya Sabatello
Received: 11 December 2015 / Revised: 8 February 2016 / Accepted: 14 February 2016 / Published: 18 February 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Precision Medicine, Law & Disability)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [208 KB, uploaded 18 February 2016]

Abstract

Reproductive genetic technologies (RGTs), including gene-editing technology, are being discovered and refined at an exponential pace. One gene-editing innovation that demands our swift attention is CRISPR/Cas9, a system of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats and a protein called Cas9. As CRISPR and other RGTs continue being developed, we must remain vigilant concerning the potential implications of genetic-engineering technology on our interpersonal and legal relationships. In the face of increasingly numerous and refined RGTs, we must maintain the rights of everyone: potential parents, prospective children, and individuals (both living and prospective) with disabilities. For those who wish to become parents, how should procreation be regulated in light of developing RGTs, especially gene-editing technology? What duties do parents owe their children, and when does such a duty attach? What role should RGTs play in parents’ fulfillment of their duties to their children? This article will contextualize the right to health and what I will term the “right to disability” in the CRISPR/Cas9 landscape. The article will then explore these rights in reference to the “subjunctive-threshold” interpretation of harm. Finally, I will argue that RGTs must be thoughtfully regulated, with such regulations taking into account the opinions of geneticists, bioethicists, and lay people concerning both the right to health and the right to disability. View Full-Text
Keywords: CRISPR; CRISPR/Cas9; gene-editing technology; genome-editing technology; genetics; disability; disability rights; law; ADA CRISPR; CRISPR/Cas9; gene-editing technology; genome-editing technology; genetics; disability; disability rights; law; ADA
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Benston, S. CRISPR, a Crossroads in Genetic Intervention: Pitting the Right to Health against the Right to Disability. Laws 2016, 5, 5.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Laws EISSN 2075-471X Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top