Next Article in Journal
Post-Release Success among Paroled Lifers
Previous Article in Journal
The Age of Consent and the Ending of Queer Theory
Previous Article in Special Issue
Addressing Trauma and Psychosocial Development in Juvenile Justice-Involved Youth: A Synthesis of the Developmental Neuroscience, Juvenile Justice and Trauma Literature
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Laws 2014, 3(4), 780-797; doi:10.3390/laws3040780

A Comparison of Female Delinquents: The Impact of Child Maltreatment Histories on Risk and Need Characteristics among a Missouri Sample

1
Missouri Office of State Courts Administrator, PO Box 104480, Jefferson City, MO 65110, USA
2
School of Social Work, University of Missouri-Columbia, 719 Clark Hall, Columbia, MO 65211, USA
3
Brown School of Social Work, Washington University in St. Louis, Campus Box 1196, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130, USA
These authors contributed equally to this work.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 1 August 2014 / Revised: 3 October 2014 / Accepted: 15 October 2014 / Published: 31 October 2014
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Development of Juvenile Delinquency)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [207 KB, uploaded 31 October 2014]

Abstract

While boys who offend have been a dominant majority and primary concern of the juvenile court since its earliest days, the population of delinquent girls has increased in recent years at a far higher rate in the U.S. The special challenges presented by females, however, continue to be generally overlooked by the justice system. Moreover, while a few specialized programs now serve these girls, the field tends to view young female offenders as a homogeneous group; what distinguishes particular female subpopulations and the characteristics associated with different criminal trajectories have gone largely unexplored. Employing data from the state of Missouri, this study examines girls who offend, identifying models that predict subsequent violent behavior that include indicators such as parental substance abuse and incarceration, and offender substance abuse, mental health, and school behavior. Special attention is given to the effects of child maltreatment, which we find significantly, but weakly correlated with violent behavior. The authors conclude by considering the possibility that maltreatment may be correlated with other criminogenic factors, and by discussing the implications of findings for future research and practice, especially services that take into account the trauma experienced by young women who come to the attention of state authorities. View Full-Text
Keywords: delinquency; juvenile justice; child maltreatment; crossover youth; gender; risk factors; Missouri delinquency; juvenile justice; child maltreatment; crossover youth; gender; risk factors; Missouri
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Dannerbeck-Janku, A.; Peters, C.; Perkins, J. A Comparison of Female Delinquents: The Impact of Child Maltreatment Histories on Risk and Need Characteristics among a Missouri Sample. Laws 2014, 3, 780-797.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Laws EISSN 2075-471X Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top