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Laws 2014, 3(4), 744-758; doi:10.3390/laws3040744

Addressing Trauma and Psychosocial Development in Juvenile Justice-Involved Youth: A Synthesis of the Developmental Neuroscience, Juvenile Justice and Trauma Literature

Department of Psychology, Rowan University, 201 Mullica Hill Road, Glassboro, NJ 08028, USA
Received: 1 July 2014 / Revised: 3 October 2014 / Accepted: 11 October 2014 / Published: 21 October 2014
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Development of Juvenile Delinquency)
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Abstract

Youth incarcerated in the juvenile justice system are disproportionately exposed to traumas both in and outside of custody that are associated with poor social, behavioral, and developmental outcomes. The purpose of this paper is to describe one pathway through which trauma can impact a myriad of outcomes, including delinquency, violence, substance use, and other behaviors that are self-regulatory in nature. Relevant research from the developmental neuroscience, juvenile justice, and trauma literatures are drawn upon and synthesized to describe this pathway. Using a multi-disciplinary approach to understanding the role that brain development and neural activity play in the relationship between trauma and associated behavioral outcomes could serve to inform juvenile justice policy decisions and intervention practice. Such application could increase the effectiveness with which juvenile justice systems work with one of the most vulnerable and traumatized populations of youth in today’s society: those incarcerated in our juvenile justice system. View Full-Text
Keywords: juvenile justice; adolescent development; self-regulation; trauma; ACEs; neural development juvenile justice; adolescent development; self-regulation; trauma; ACEs; neural development
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Evans-Chase, M. Addressing Trauma and Psychosocial Development in Juvenile Justice-Involved Youth: A Synthesis of the Developmental Neuroscience, Juvenile Justice and Trauma Literature. Laws 2014, 3, 744-758.

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