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Societies 2018, 8(2), 42; https://doi.org/10.3390/soc8020042

The Perceptions of Police-Black Civilian Deadly Encounters in North America among Black Immigrants in a Western Canadian City

Department of Sociology, University of Alberta, Edmonton AB T6G 2H4, Canada
Received: 20 April 2018 / Revised: 8 June 2018 / Accepted: 12 June 2018 / Published: 16 June 2018
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Abstract

This study investigates black immigrants’ perceptions of police-black civilian deadly encounters in North America. Twenty semi-structured, in-depth interviews were conducted among black immigrants in Edmonton, western Canada. The respondents perceived racism, police brutality, black criminality, gun violence and police perception of black people as ‘violent’ as the causal factors in deadly encounters. There was also the perception of criminal injustice and conspiracy among the agents of the criminal justice system (CJS) in the treatment of victims and suspects. This study suggests that personal and media experiences can influence how people de/re/construct deadly encounters and the treatment of victims and suspects by the CJS. Findings also reveal that when members of a racial (immigrant) minority perceive themselves as the target of a discriminatory CJS, they may adopt cautious and cooperative actions rather than aggressive or deviant behaviour to avoid criminalization and victimization. The study concludes that the perception of criminal injustice in police deadly violence against black (minority) civilians could influence: (i) where (black) immigrants locate themselves within the CJS in North America, and (ii) how (black) immigrants perceive and respond to the agents of the CJS, such as the police, when they encounter them. View Full-Text
Keywords: black immigrants; North America; perception of criminal (in)justice; police-civilian interaction; police violence; racial minorities; racialization; treatment of (criminal) suspect; treatment of victim black immigrants; North America; perception of criminal (in)justice; police-civilian interaction; police violence; racial minorities; racialization; treatment of (criminal) suspect; treatment of victim
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
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Ayoyo, D.D. The Perceptions of Police-Black Civilian Deadly Encounters in North America among Black Immigrants in a Western Canadian City. Societies 2018, 8, 42.

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