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Insects 2016, 7(4), 69; doi:10.3390/insects7040069

Positive and Negative Impacts of Non-Native Bee Species around the World

Mueller Lab, Biology Department, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA
Academic Editor: Mary L. Cornelius
Received: 30 October 2016 / Revised: 17 November 2016 / Accepted: 18 November 2016 / Published: 28 November 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Invasive Insect Species)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [512 KB, uploaded 28 November 2016]   |  

Abstract

Though they are relatively understudied, non-native bees are ubiquitous and have enormous potential economic and environmental impacts. These impacts may be positive or negative, and are often unquantified. In this manuscript, I review literature on the known distribution and environmental and economic impacts of 80 species of introduced bees. The potential negative impacts of non-native bees include competition with native bees for nesting sites or floral resources, pollination of invasive weeds, co-invasion with pathogens and parasites, genetic introgression, damage to buildings, affecting the pollination of native plant species, and changing the structure of native pollination networks. The potential positive impacts of non-native bees include agricultural pollination, availability for scientific research, rescue of native species, and resilience to human-mediated disturbance and climate change. Most non-native bee species are accidentally introduced and nest in stems, twigs, and cavities in wood. In terms of number of species, the best represented families are Megachilidae and Apidae, and the best represented genus is Megachile. The best studied genera are Apis and Bombus, and most of the species in these genera were deliberately introduced for agricultural pollination. Thus, we know little about the majority of non-native bees, accidentally introduced or spreading beyond their native ranges. View Full-Text
Keywords: bees; competition; genetic introgression; impacts; invasive species; pollination; species introductions bees; competition; genetic introgression; impacts; invasive species; pollination; species introductions
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Russo, L. Positive and Negative Impacts of Non-Native Bee Species around the World. Insects 2016, 7, 69.

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