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J. Pers. Med. 2015, 5(4), 354-369; doi:10.3390/jpm5040354

“Cancer 2015”: A Prospective, Population-Based Cancer Cohort—Phase 1: Feasibility of Genomics-Guided Precision Medicine in the Clinic

1
Division of Cancer Research, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, 7 St Andrews Place, East Melbourne VIC 3002, Australia
2
Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, The University of Melbourne, Parkville VIC 3010, Australia
3
Department of Pathology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne VIC 3002, Australia
4
Department of Epidemiology and Preventative Medicine, Alfred Centre, Monash University, Prahran VIC 3181, Australia
5
Centre for Health Economics, Monash University, Clayton VIC 3800, Australia
6
Translational Genomics and Epigenomics Laboratory, Olivia Newton-John Cancer Research Institute, Austin Health, Heidelberg VIC 3084, Australia
7
Department of Pathology, The University of Melbourne, Parkville VIC 3010, Australia
8
School of Cancer Medicine, La Trobe University, Bundoora VIC 3084, Australia
9
Medical Oncology, Olivia Newton-John Cancer Research Institute, Austin Health, Heidelberg VIC 3084, Australia
10
Division of Cancer Medicine, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne VIC 3002, Australia
11
Department of Medical Oncology, The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Melbourne Health, Parkville VIC 3010, Australia
12
The Andrew Love Cancer Centre, Geelong Hospital, Barwon Health, Geelong VIC 3220, Australia
13
Warrnambool Hospital, SouthWest Healthcare, Warrnambool VIC 3280, Australia
14
Department of Surgery, Cabrini Institute, Cabrini Health, Malvern VIC 3144, Australia
15
Haematology and Oncology, Cabrini Institute, Cabrini Health, Malvern VIC 3144, Australia
16
The Kinghorn Cancer Centre and Garvan Institute, Victoria Street, Darlinghurst 2010, NSW, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Scott T. Weiss
Received: 9 July 2015 / Revised: 21 September 2015 / Accepted: 9 October 2015 / Published: 29 October 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Implementing Personalized Medicine in a Large Health Care System)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [1146 KB, uploaded 29 October 2015]   |  

Abstract

“Cancer 2015” is a longitudinal and prospective cohort. It is a phased study whose aim was to pilot recruiting 1000 patients during phase 1 to establish the feasibility of providing a population-based genomics cohort. Newly diagnosed adult patients with solid cancers, with residual tumour material for molecular genomics testing, were recruited into the cohort for the collection of a dataset containing clinical, molecular pathology, health resource use and outcomes data. 1685 patients have been recruited over almost 3 years from five hospitals. Thirty-two percent are aged between 61–70 years old, with a median age of 63 years. Diagnostic tumour samples were obtained for 90% of these patients for multiple parallel sequencing. Patients identified with somatic mutations of potentially “actionable” variants represented almost 10% of those tumours sequenced, while 42% of the cohort had no mutations identified. These genomic data were annotated with information such as cancer site, stage, morphology, treatment and patient outcomes and health resource use and cost. This cohort has delivered its main objective of establishing an upscalable genomics cohort within a clinical setting and in phase 2 aims to develop a protocol for how genomics testing can be used in real-time clinical decision-making, providing evidence on the value of precision medicine to clinical practice. View Full-Text
Keywords: cancer genomics cohort; next-Gen sequencing; precision medicine; health economics cancer genomics cohort; next-Gen sequencing; precision medicine; health economics
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Parisot, J.P.; Thorne, H.; Fellowes, A.; Doig, K.; Lucas, M.; McNeil, J.J.; Doble, B.; Dobrovic, A.; John, T.; James, P.A.; Lipton, L.; Ashley, D.; Hayes, T.; McMurrick, P.; Richardson, G.; Lorgelly, P.; Fox, S.B.; Thomas, D.M. “Cancer 2015”: A Prospective, Population-Based Cancer Cohort—Phase 1: Feasibility of Genomics-Guided Precision Medicine in the Clinic. J. Pers. Med. 2015, 5, 354-369.

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