Next Article in Journal
Neurocognitive Outcomes and School Performance in Solid Tumor Cancer Survivors Lacking Therapy to the Central Nervous System
Previous Article in Journal
Atrophic Vaginitis in Breast Cancer Survivors: A Difficult Survivorship Issue
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
J. Pers. Med. 2015, 5(2), 67-82; doi:10.3390/jpm5020067

Perspectives on Genetic and Genomic Technologies in an Academic Medical Center: The Duke Experience

1
Center for Applied Genomics and Precision Medicine, Duke University School of Medicine and Health System, Durham, NC 27708, USA
2
Duke Science and Society, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
3
Duke University School of Nursing, Durham, NC 27708, USA
4
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029, USA
5
Sanofi, Cambridge, MA 08807, USA
6
Sanford School of Public Policy, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Stephen B. Liggett
Received: 21 January 2015 / Revised: 16 March 2015 / Accepted: 2 April 2015 / Published: 3 April 2015
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [870 KB, uploaded 3 April 2015]   |  

Abstract

In this age of personalized medicine, genetic and genomic testing is expected to become instrumental in health care delivery, but little is known about its actual implementation in clinical practice. Methods. We surveyed Duke faculty and healthcare providers to examine the extent of genetic and genomic testing adoption. We assessed providers’ use of genetic and genomic testing options and indications in clinical practice, providers’ awareness of pharmacogenetic applications, and providers’ opinions on returning research-generated genetic test results to participants. Most clinician respondents currently use family history routinely in their clinical practice, but only 18 percent of clinicians use pharmacogenetics. Only two respondents correctly identified the number of drug package inserts with pharmacogenetic indications. We also found strong support for the return of genetic research results to participants. Our results demonstrate that while Duke healthcare providers are enthusiastic about genomic technologies, use of genomic tools outside of research has been limited. Respondents favor return of research-based genetic results to participants, but clinicians lack knowledge about pharmacogenetic applications. We identified challenges faced by this institution when implementing genetic and genomic testing into patient care that should inform a policy and education agenda to improve provider support and clinician-researcher partnerships. View Full-Text
Keywords: personalized medicine; genetic tests; genomic tests; clinical implementation; pharmacogenetics; knowledge gaps; physician education; return of research results personalized medicine; genetic tests; genomic tests; clinical implementation; pharmacogenetics; knowledge gaps; physician education; return of research results
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Katsanis, S.H.; Minear, M.A.; Vorderstrasse, A.; Yang, N.; Reeves, J.W.; Rakhra-Burris, T.; Cook-Deegan, R.; Ginsburg, G.S.; Simmons, L.A. Perspectives on Genetic and Genomic Technologies in an Academic Medical Center: The Duke Experience. J. Pers. Med. 2015, 5, 67-82.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
J. Pers. Med. EISSN 2075-4426 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top