Next Article in Journal / Special Issue
Functional Characterization of the FNT Family Nitrite Transporter of Marine Picocyanobacteria
Previous Article in Journal / Special Issue
The RUBISCO to Photosystem II Ratio Limits the Maximum Photosynthetic Rate in Picocyanobacteria
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessReview
Life 2015, 5(1), 418-431; doi:10.3390/life5010418

Long-Term Changes in Cyanobacteria Populations in Lake Kinneret (Sea of Galilee), Israel: An Eco-Physiological Outlook

1,†,* , 2,†
and
3,†
1
The Yigal Allon Kinneret Limnological Laboratory, Israel Oceanographic and Limnological Research, Migdal, Israel
2
Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel
3
The Yigal Allon Kinneret Limnological Laboratory, Israel Oceanographic and Limnological Research, Migdal, Israel
These authors contributed equally to this work.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: John C. Meeks and Robert Haselkorn
Received: 19 November 2014 / Revised: 26 January 2015 / Accepted: 29 January 2015 / Published: 5 February 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cyanobacteria: Ecology, Physiology and Genetics)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [585 KB, uploaded 5 February 2015]   |  

Abstract

The long-term record of cyanobacteria abundance in Lake Kinneret (Sea of Galilee), Israel, demonstrates changes in cyanobacteria abundance and composition in the last five decades. New invasive species of the order Nostocales (Aphanizomenon ovalisporum and Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii) became part of the annual phytoplankton assemblage during summer-autumn. Concomitantly, bloom events of Microcystis sp. (Chroococcales) during winter-spring intensified. These changes in cyanobacteria pattern may be partly attributed to the management policy in Lake Kinneret’s vicinity and watershed aimed to reduce effluent discharge to the lake and partly to climate changes in the region; i.e., increased water column temperature, less wind and reduced precipitation. The gradual decrease in the concentration of total and dissolved phosphorus and total and dissolved nitrogen and an increase in alkalinity, pH and salinity, combined with the physiological features of cyanobacteria, probably contributed to the success of cyanobacteria. The data presented here indicate that the trend of the continuous decline of nutrients may not be sufficient to reduce and to control the abundance and proliferation of toxic and non-toxic cyanobacteria. View Full-Text
Keywords: Lake Kinneret; phytoplankton shift; cyanobacteria; nutrients; management Lake Kinneret; phytoplankton shift; cyanobacteria; nutrients; management
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Hadas, O.; Kaplan, A.; Sukenik, A. Long-Term Changes in Cyanobacteria Populations in Lake Kinneret (Sea of Galilee), Israel: An Eco-Physiological Outlook. Life 2015, 5, 418-431.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Life EISSN 2075-1729 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top