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Minerals 2018, 8(6), 252; https://doi.org/10.3390/min8060252

Contribution of Benthic Processes to the Growth of Ooids on a Low-Energy Shore in Cat Island, The Bahamas

1
Department of Oceanography and Coastal Sciences, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, USA
2
Center for Computation and Technology, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, USA
3
Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
4
Department of Geosciences, Smith College, Northampton, MA 01063, USA
5
California Institute of Technology, Division of Geologic and Planetary Sciences, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 1 May 2018 / Revised: 7 June 2018 / Accepted: 11 June 2018 / Published: 14 June 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microbialites: Preservation of Extant and Extinct Systems)
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Abstract

Ooids are typically found in frequently reworked coastal sediments, and are thought to accrete by inorganic chemical precipitation around moving grains. The high organic content and the presence of biosignatures, however, suggest that ooids interact with benthic microbial communities. Here, we investigate the role of benthic processes on ooid growth on a leeward shore of Cat Island, The Bahamas. Polished ooids are present in the surf zone, whereas dull ooids and grapestones are present in microbially colonized sediments seaward of the surf zone. Wave hydrodynamics and sediment transport modeling suggest that microbially colonized sediments are mobilized at monthly time scales. We propose a new conceptual model for both ooids and grapestone. Ooids rest and accrete in the area covered by microbial mats, but are periodically transported to the surf zone where wave abrasion polishes them within days. Ooids are then transported back to microbially colonized areas where the accretion cycle resumes. Ooids too large to be transported become trapped outside the surf zone, exit the “conveyor belt” and become grapestones. The benthic growth mechanism predicts petrographic characteristics that match observations: successive ooid laminae do not thin outward, laminae exhibit irregularities, and some ooids include multiple nuclei. View Full-Text
Keywords: Pigeon Cay; grapestone; abrasion; carbonate precipitation; microbial mat Pigeon Cay; grapestone; abrasion; carbonate precipitation; microbial mat
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
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Mariotti, G.; Pruss, S.B.; Summons, R.E.; Newman, S.A.; Bosak, T. Contribution of Benthic Processes to the Growth of Ooids on a Low-Energy Shore in Cat Island, The Bahamas. Minerals 2018, 8, 252.

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