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Minerals 2017, 7(9), 154; https://doi.org/10.3390/min7090154

Optical Observations and Geochemical Data in Deep-Sea Hexa- and Octo-Coralla Specimens

1
Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris (IPGP), UMR CNRS 7154, Université Paris Diderot, 1 Rue Jussieu, F-75238 Paris CEDEX 05, France
2
Museum National d’Histoire Naturelle, CR2P, 8 rue Buffon, 75005 Paris, France
3
Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l’Environnement (LSCE), UMR 8212 (CEA/CNRS/UVSQ/UPS) 4, Avenue de la Terrasse, F-91198 Gif-sur-Yvette CEDEX, France
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 13 July 2017 / Revised: 17 August 2017 / Accepted: 23 August 2017 / Published: 25 August 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Organo-Mineral Interactions)
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Abstract

Coral skeletons are built by Ca-carbonate (calcite or aragonite) crystals that exhibit distinct morphological patterns and specific spatial arrangements that constitute skeletal microstructures. Additionally, the long-standing recognition that distinct coral species growing in similar conditions are able to record environmental changes with species-specific responses provides convincing evidence that, beyond the thermodynamic rules for chemical precipitation, a biological influence is at work during the crystallization process. Through several series of comparative structural and geochemical (elemental and isotopic) data, this paper aims to firmly establish the specific properties of the distinct major taxonomic units that are commonly gathered as deep-water “corals” in current literature. Moreover, taking advantage of recent micrometric and infra-micrometric observations, attention is drawn to the remarkable similarity of the calcareous material observed at the nanoscale. These observations suggest a common biomineralization model in which mineralogical criteria are not the leading factors for the interpretation of the geochemical measurements. View Full-Text
Keywords: deep-sea corals; vital effects; elemental ratios; biomineralization; nanograins; boron isotopes; oxygen and carbon isotopes deep-sea corals; vital effects; elemental ratios; biomineralization; nanograins; boron isotopes; oxygen and carbon isotopes
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Rollion-Bard, C.; Cuif, J.-P.; Blamart, D. Optical Observations and Geochemical Data in Deep-Sea Hexa- and Octo-Coralla Specimens. Minerals 2017, 7, 154.

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