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Antibodies 2016, 5(3), 18; doi:10.3390/antib5030018

Antiphospholipid Antibodies: From General Concepts to Its Relation with Malignancies

1
Grupo de Inmunología Celular e Inmunogenética y Grupo de Reumatología, Universidad de Antioquia, Medellín 05004, Antioquia, Colombia
2
Consultor de Reumatología, Dinámica IPS, Medellín 050015, Antioquia, Colombia
3
Department of Autoimmune Diseases, Hospital Clínic, Villarroel, 170, Barcelona 08036, Catalonia, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Dimiter S. Dimitrov
Received: 10 May 2016 / Revised: 23 June 2016 / Accepted: 5 July 2016 / Published: 2 August 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antiphospholipid Antibodies and Syndrome)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [189 KB, uploaded 2 August 2016]

Abstract

Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an adquired autoimmune pro-thrombotic disease characterized by arterial and/or venous thrombosis and/or fetal losses associated with the persistent presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) detectable by solid phase assays (anticardiolipin (aCL) and anti-β2 glycoprotein I, β2GPI) and/or functional coagulation test (lupus anticoagulant (LA)). Most patients with typical APS manifestations have the presence of one or more of conventional aPL, but, some patients might exhibit clinical features related with APS but with persistent negative determinations of “classic” aPL (seronegative APS). Expanding the network of autoantibodies in patients highly suspected of having APS but who have normal results from a conventional test using new antibodies (i.e., phosphatidylserine/prothrombin and β2GPI domain 1) would increase the diagnosis. Thrombosis is one of the leading causes of death among patients with cancer, representing up to 15% of all deaths. Cancer increases the risk of thrombosis and chemotherapy is further associated with a higher risk of thrombosis. In addition, aPL may contribute to an increased risk of thrombosis in patients with malignancies, although the levels do not seem to reflect their pathogenicity. Several malignancies, particularly hematological and lymphoproliferative malignancies, may indeed be associated with the generation of aPL but do not necessarily enhance the thrombophilic risk in these patients. View Full-Text
Keywords: antiphospholipid antibodies; lupus anticoagulant; anticardiolipin antibodies; cancer; malignancies; catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome antiphospholipid antibodies; lupus anticoagulant; anticardiolipin antibodies; cancer; malignancies; catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Gómez-Puerta, J.A.; Espinosa, G.; Cervera, R. Antiphospholipid Antibodies: From General Concepts to Its Relation with Malignancies. Antibodies 2016, 5, 18.

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