Next Article in Journal
Simulation of Pan Evaporation and Application to Estimate the Evaporation of Juyan Lake, Northwest China under a Hyper-Arid Climate
Previous Article in Journal
Spatial Evaluation of Multiple Benefits to Encourage Multi-Functional Design of Sustainable Drainage in Blue-Green Cities
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Water 2017, 9(12), 957; doi:10.3390/w9120957

Impacts of Climate Change and Human Activities on the Three Gorges Reservoir Inflow

1
College of Hydrology and Water Resources, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098, China
2
National Engineering Research Center of Water Resources Efficient Utilization and Engineering Safety, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098, China
3
School of Earth Sciences and Engineering, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098, China
4
Bureau of Hydrology, Changjiang Water Resources Commission, Wuhan 430010, China
5
Jiuweigang Water Conservancy Project Management Office of Nantong City, Nantong 226003, China
6
Geological Survey of Jiangsu Province, Nanjing 210018, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 10 November 2017 / Revised: 1 December 2017 / Accepted: 4 December 2017 / Published: 7 December 2017
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [3674 KB, uploaded 7 December 2017]   |  

Abstract

Identifying changes in runoff and quantifying the impacts of climate change and human activities are of great significance for water resources planning and management in a river basin. In this study, an inflow series of the Three Gorges Reservoir observed from 1951 to 2016 is used to identify the trend and abrupt change point by using statistical methods. Based on the meteorological data, soil type data, and land use data during the same period, the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model is established to quantitatively attribute changes in the Three Gorges Reservoir inflow to climate change and human activities separately and discuss the differences between the two-stage method, which divides the whole study period into two stages to analyze the reasons for runoff evolution, and multi-stage method, which divides the whole study period into more stages to consider the temporal and spatial variation of land use/cover (LULC). The results show: (1) During the study period, a significant decrease is detected in the Three Gorges Reservoir inflow and the decrease rate is 7.7 km3 per ten years, annual total precipitation decreases by −13.5 mm per ten years, and annual average temperature increases by 0.1 °C per ten years. (2) Contribution of climate change and human activities is around 7:3. Climate change is the main reason for the decrease in the Three Gorges Reservoir inflow. (3) Results of stages in multi-stage method are different from the result of two-stage method. Accumulative results of multi-stage method and result of two-stage method are consistent. There are some changes in results of every stage, which are different from the accumulative results. View Full-Text
Keywords: Three Gorges Reservoir; reservoir inflow; climate change; human activities; LUCC Three Gorges Reservoir; reservoir inflow; climate change; human activities; LUCC
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Zhang, Y.; Zhong, P.-A.; Chen, J.; Bing, J.; Xu, D.; Wang, M. Impacts of Climate Change and Human Activities on the Three Gorges Reservoir Inflow. Water 2017, 9, 957.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Water EISSN 2073-4441 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top