Next Article in Journal
Can Rapid Assessments Predict the Biotic Condition of Restored Streams?
Next Article in Special Issue
Performance of an Underground Stormwater Detention Chamber and Comparison with Stormwater Management Ponds
Previous Article in Journal
Adaptive Kalman Filter Based on Adjustable Sampling Interval in Burst Detection for Water Distribution System
Previous Article in Special Issue
Valuing the Potential Benefits of Water Quality Improvements in Watersheds Affected by Non-Point Source Pollution
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Water 2016, 8(4), 145; doi:10.3390/w8040145

Analysis of Best Management Practices Implementation on Water Quality Using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool

Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Kelly Morgan
Received: 20 January 2016 / Revised: 25 March 2016 / Accepted: 6 April 2016 / Published: 12 April 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue BMP Development, Implementation, and Performance)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [2535 KB, uploaded 12 April 2016]   |  

Abstract

The formation of hypoxic zone in the Gulf of Mexico can be traced to agricultural watersheds in the Midwestern United States that are artificially drained in order to make the land suitable for agriculture. A number of best management practices (BMPs) have been introduced to improve the water quality in the region but their relative effectivenss of these BMPs in reducing nutrient load has not been properly quantified. In order to determine the BMPs useful for reducing nutrient discharge from a tile drained watershed, a Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model was calibrated and validated for water flow and nitrate load using experimental data from the Little Vermillion River (LVR) watershed in east-central Illinois. Then, the performance of four common BMPs (reduced tillage, cover crop, filter strip and wetlands) were evaluated. For BMPs, the usage of rye as cover crop performed the best in reducing nitrate discharge from the watershed as a single BMP, with an average annual nitrate load reduction of 54.5%. Combining no tillage and rye cover crops had varying results over the period simulated, but the average nitrate reduction was better than using rye cover crops with conventional tillage, with the average annual nitrate discharge decreased by 60.5% (an improvement of 13% over rye only). View Full-Text
Keywords: best management practices; modeling; non-point source pollution; tile drainage; SWAT best management practices; modeling; non-point source pollution; tile drainage; SWAT
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Motsinger, J.; Kalita, P.; Bhattarai, R. Analysis of Best Management Practices Implementation on Water Quality Using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool. Water 2016, 8, 145.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Water EISSN 2073-4441 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top