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Water 2015, 7(8), 4427-4445; doi:10.3390/w7084427

Impacts of Land Use on Surface Water Quality in a Subtropical River Basin: A Case Study of the Dongjiang River Basin, Southeastern China

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State Key Laboratory of Earth Surface Processes and Resource Ecology, Beijing Normal University, No.19 Xinjiekouwai Street, Haidian District, Beijing 100875, China
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College of Resources Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, No.19 Xinjiekouwai Street, Haidian District, Beijing 100875, China
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Shenzhen Academy of Environmental Sciences, No.50, 1st Honggui Street, Honggui Road, Shenzhen 518001, China
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Faculty of Land Resource Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, No. 68 Wenchang Road, Kunming 650093, China
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Richard Skeffington
Received: 10 June 2015 / Revised: 1 August 2015 / Accepted: 4 August 2015 / Published: 12 August 2015
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [2301 KB, uploaded 12 August 2015]   |  

Abstract

Understanding the relationship between land use and surface water quality is necessary for effective water management. We estimated the impacts of catchment-wide land use on water quality during the dry and rainy seasons in the Dongjiang River basin, using remote sensing, geographic information systems and multivariate statistical techniques. The results showed that the 83 sites can be divided into three groups representing different land use types: forest, agriculture and urban. Water quality parameters exhibited significant variations between the urban-dominated and forest-dominated sites. The proportion of forested land was positively associated with dissolved oxygen concentration but negatively associated with water temperature, electrical conductivity, permanganate index, total phosphorus, total nitrogen, ammonia nitrogen, nitrate nitrogen and chlorophyll-a. The proportion of urban land was strongly positively associated with total nitrogen and ammonia nitrogen concentrations. Forested and urban land use had stronger impacts on water quality in the dry season than in the rainy season. However, agricultural land use did not have a significant impact on water quality. Our study indicates that urban land use was the key factor affecting water quality change, and limiting point-source waste discharge in urban areas during the dry season would be critical for improving water quality in the study area. View Full-Text
Keywords: land use; water quality; multivariate statistical techniques; seasonality; watershed management; Dongjiang River basin land use; water quality; multivariate statistical techniques; seasonality; watershed management; Dongjiang River basin
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Ding, J.; Jiang, Y.; Fu, L.; Liu, Q.; Peng, Q.; Kang, M. Impacts of Land Use on Surface Water Quality in a Subtropical River Basin: A Case Study of the Dongjiang River Basin, Southeastern China. Water 2015, 7, 4427-4445.

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