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Water 2015, 7(8), 4343-4361; doi:10.3390/w7084343

Spatiotemporal Distribution of Soil Moisture and Salinity in the Taklimakan Desert Highway Shelterbelt

1
Xinjiang Institute of Ecology and Geography, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi 830011, Xinjiang, China
2
University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 10000, China
3
College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling 712100, China
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Miklas Scholz
Received: 2 June 2015 / Revised: 26 July 2015 / Accepted: 27 July 2015 / Published: 6 August 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Water Resources Assessment and Management in Drylands)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [2612 KB, uploaded 6 August 2015]   |  

Abstract

Salinization and secondary salinization often appear after irrigation with saline water. The Taklimakan Desert Highway Shelterbelt has been irrigated with saline ground water for more than ten years; however, soil salinity in the shelterbelt has not been evaluated. The objective of this study was to analyze the spatial and temporal distribution of soil moisture and salinity in the shelterbelt system. Using a non-uniform grid method, soil samples were collected every two days during one ten-day irrigation cycle in July 2014 and one day in spring, summer, and autumn. The results indicated that soil moisture declined linearly with time during the irrigation cycle. Soil moisture was greatest in the southern and eastern sections of the study area. In contrast to soil moisture, soil electrical conductivity increased from 2 to 6 days after irrigation, and then gradually decreased from 6 to 8 days after irrigation. Soil moisture was the greatest in spring and the least in summer. In contrast, soil salinity increased from spring to autumn. Long time drip-irrigation with saline groundwater increased soil salinity slightly. The soil salt content was closely associated with soil texture. The current soil salt content did not affect plant growth, however, the soil in the shelterbelt should be continuously monitored to prevent salinization in the future. View Full-Text
Keywords: saline water drip irrigation; salinity; moisture; spatiotemporal distribution; Geostatistics saline water drip irrigation; salinity; moisture; spatiotemporal distribution; Geostatistics
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Huang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Zhao, Y.; Xu, X.; Zhang, J.; Li, C. Spatiotemporal Distribution of Soil Moisture and Salinity in the Taklimakan Desert Highway Shelterbelt. Water 2015, 7, 4343-4361.

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