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Water 2018, 10(3), 246; https://doi.org/10.3390/w10030246

Distribution and Abundance of Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Sand Settling Reservoirs and Drinking Water Treatment Plants across the Yellow River, China

1,2
,
1,2
,
1,2
,
1,2
and
1,2,*
1
State Key Laboratory of Environmental Aquatic Chemistry, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085, China
2
University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 17 January 2018 / Revised: 22 February 2018 / Accepted: 23 February 2018 / Published: 28 February 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antimicrobial Resistance in Environmental Waters)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [2645 KB, uploaded 28 February 2018]   |  

Abstract

Understanding how antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) are distributed in drinking water treatment processes is important due to their potential public health risk. Little is known about the occurrence and distribution of ARGs in typical drinking water treatment processes, such as sand settling reservoirs (SSRs) and drinking water treatment plants (DWTPs), in the Yellow River, especially at the catchment scale. In this study, ARG profiling was investigated from water samples of influent (river water) and effluent (source water) of SSRs and finished water of DWTPs in six cities along the Yellow River catchment using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Seventeen ARGs and two mobile genetic elements (MGEs) were detected, among which aadE, strA, strB, tetA, sulII, intl1, and Tn916 had high detection rates (over 80%). The absolute abundances (gene copies/mL of water) of ARGs were reduced by the SSRs and DWTPs generally, but no reductions were observed for the relative abundances (gene copies/16S rRNA gene) of ARGs. Spatial distributions of ARGs and bacteria were not observed. The distribution of bacterial genera was clustered into four dominant patterns in different water type samples. The bacterial genera Pseudomonas, Massilia, Acinetobacter, Sphingomonas, Methylobacterium, and Brevundimonas dominated the finished water, with Brevundimonas and Methylobacterium being speculated to be potential hosts for two ARGs (strA and strB) through network analysis. The enrichment of these two genera, likely caused by selection of disinfection process, may contribute to the higher relative abundance of ARGs in finished water. This study provides insight and effective assessment of the potential risk of ARGs in drinking water treatment processes at the catchment scale. View Full-Text
Keywords: antibiotic resistance gene; sand settling reservoirs; drinking water treatment plants; the Yellow River antibiotic resistance gene; sand settling reservoirs; drinking water treatment plants; the Yellow River
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Lu, J.; Tian, Z.; Yu, J.; Yang, M.; Zhang, Y. Distribution and Abundance of Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Sand Settling Reservoirs and Drinking Water Treatment Plants across the Yellow River, China. Water 2018, 10, 246.

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