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Atmosphere 2018, 9(5), 167; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos9050167

Climate Change Impacts on Natural Sulfur Production: Ocean Acidification and Community Shifts

1
Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545, USA
2
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Joint Global Change Research Institute, 5825 University Research Court, College Park, MD 20740, USA
3
Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37830, USA
4
Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 15 February 2018 / Revised: 6 April 2018 / Accepted: 25 April 2018 / Published: 1 May 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ocean Contributions to the Marine Boundary Layer Aerosol Budget)
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Abstract

Utilizing the reduced-complexity model Hector, a regional scale analysis was conducted quantifying the possible effects climate change may have on dimethyl sulfide (DMS) emissions within the oceans. The investigation began with a review of the sulfur cycle in modern Earth system models. We then expanded the biogeochemical representation within Hector to include a natural ocean component while accounting for acidification and planktonic community shifts. The report presents results from both a latitudinal and a global perspective. This new approach highlights disparate outcomes which have been inadequately characterized via planetary averages in past publications. Our findings suggest that natural sulfur emissions (ESN) may exert a forcing up to 4 times that of the CO2 marine feedback, 0.62 and 0.15 Wm−2, respectively, and reverse the radiative forcing sign in low latitudes. Additionally, sensitivity tests were conducted to demonstrate the need for further examination of the DMS loop. Ultimately, the present work attempts to include dynamic ESN within reduced-complexity simulations of the sulfur cycle, illustrating its impact on the global radiative budget. View Full-Text
Keywords: dimethyl sulfide; marine biogeochemical feedback; climate change; phytoplankton; ocean acidification; community shifts; Phaeocystis dimethyl sulfide; marine biogeochemical feedback; climate change; phytoplankton; ocean acidification; community shifts; Phaeocystis
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
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Menzo, Z.M.; Elliott, S.; Hartin, C.A.; Hoffman, F.M.; Wang, S. Climate Change Impacts on Natural Sulfur Production: Ocean Acidification and Community Shifts. Atmosphere 2018, 9, 167.

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