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Genes 2018, 9(2), 59; https://doi.org/10.3390/genes9020059

The AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Homolog Snf1 Concerts Carbon Utilization, Conidia Production and the Biosynthesis of Secondary Metabolites in the Taxol-Producer Pestalotiopsis microspora

1
National Key Program of Microbiology and Department of Microbiology, College of Life Sciences, Nankai University (DMNU), Tianjin 300071, China
2
Beijing Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering Drug and Biotechnology, Institute of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Life Sciences, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875, China
These authors contributed equally to this work.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 10 November 2017 / Revised: 16 January 2018 / Accepted: 17 January 2018 / Published: 24 January 2018
(This article belongs to the Section Microbial Genetics and Genomics)
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Abstract

Highly conserved, the Snf1/AMPK is a central regulator of carbon metabolism and energy production in the eukaryotes. However, its function in filamentous fungi has not been well established. In this study, we reported functional characterization of Snf1/AMPK in the growth, development and secondary metabolism in the filamentous fungus Pestalotiopsis microspora. By deletion of the yeast SNF1 homolog, we found that it regulated the utilization of carbon sources, e.g., sucrose, demonstrating a conserved function of this kinase in filamentous fungus. Importantly, several novel functions of SNF1 were unraveled. For instance, the deletion strain displayed remarkable retardation in vegetative growth and pigmentation and produced a diminished number of conidia, even in the presence of the primary carbon source glucose. Deletion of the gene caused damages in the cell wall as shown by its hypersensitivities to Calcofluor white and Congo red, suggesting a critical role of Snf1 in maintaining cell wall integrity. Furthermore, the mutant strain Δsnf1 was hypersensitive to stress, e.g., osmotic pressure (1 M sorbitol), drug G418 and heat shock, though the mechanism remains to be illustrated. Significantly, disruption of the gene altered the production of secondary metabolites. By high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) profiling, we found that Δsnf1 barely produced secondary metabolites, e.g., the known product pestalotiollide B. This study suggests that Snf1 is a key regulator in filamentous fungus Pestalotiopsis microspora concerting carbon metabolism and the filamentous growth, conidiation, cell wall integrity, stress tolerance and the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites. View Full-Text
Keywords: Snf1/AMPK; secondary metabolism; cell wall integrity; conidiation; Pestalotiopsis microspora Snf1/AMPK; secondary metabolism; cell wall integrity; conidiation; Pestalotiopsis microspora
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Wang, D.; Li, Y.; Wang, H.; Wei, D.; Akhberdi, O.; Liu, Y.; Xiang, B.; Hao, X.; Zhu, X. The AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Homolog Snf1 Concerts Carbon Utilization, Conidia Production and the Biosynthesis of Secondary Metabolites in the Taxol-Producer Pestalotiopsis microspora. Genes 2018, 9, 59.

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