Next Article in Journal
Using Human iPSC-Derived Neurons to Uncover Activity-Dependent Non-Coding RNAs
Previous Article in Journal
Comparative Analysis of Four Calypogeia Species Revealed Unexpected Change in Evolutionarily-Stable Liverwort Mitogenomes
Article Menu
Issue 12 (December) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessReview
Genes 2017, 8(12), 399; https://doi.org/10.3390/genes8120399

Genome Editing Tools in Plants

1
Department of Biotechnology, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan 38541, Korea
2
Botany and Microbiology Department, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia
3
Mycology and Plant Disease Survey Department, Plant Pathology Research Institute, Agriculture Research Center, Giza 12619, Egypt
4
Plant Production Department, College of Food and Agriculture Science, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 16 November 2017 / Revised: 8 December 2017 / Accepted: 15 December 2017 / Published: 19 December 2017
(This article belongs to the Section Plant Genetics and Genomics)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [2727 KB, uploaded 19 December 2017]   |  

Abstract

Genome editing tools have the potential to change the genomic architecture of a genome at precise locations, with desired accuracy. These tools have been efficiently used for trait discovery and for the generation of plants with high crop yields and resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses. Due to complex genomic architecture, it is challenging to edit all of the genes/genomes using a particular genome editing tool. Therefore, to overcome this challenging task, several genome editing tools have been developed to facilitate efficient genome editing. Some of the major genome editing tools used to edit plant genomes are: Homologous recombination (HR), zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), pentatricopeptide repeat proteins (PPRs), the CRISPR/Cas9 system, RNA interference (RNAi), cisgenesis, and intragenesis. In addition, site-directed sequence editing and oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis have the potential to edit the genome at the single-nucleotide level. Recently, adenine base editors (ABEs) have been developed to mutate A-T base pairs to G-C base pairs. ABEs use deoxyadeninedeaminase (TadA) with catalytically impaired Cas9 nickase to mutate A-T base pairs to G-C base pairs. View Full-Text
Keywords: genome editing; homologous recombination; Zinc finger nuclease; TALEN; pentatricopeptide repeat protein; CRISPR/Cas9; adenine base editors; RNAi; site-directed sequence editing; oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis; cisgenesis and intragenesis; plastid genome; synthetic genomics genome editing; homologous recombination; Zinc finger nuclease; TALEN; pentatricopeptide repeat protein; CRISPR/Cas9; adenine base editors; RNAi; site-directed sequence editing; oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis; cisgenesis and intragenesis; plastid genome; synthetic genomics
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Supplementary material

SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Mohanta, T.K.; Bashir, T.; Hashem, A.; Abd_Allah, E.F.; Bae, H. Genome Editing Tools in Plants. Genes 2017, 8, 399.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Genes EISSN 2073-4425 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top