Next Article in Journal
Assays to Monitor Autophagy Progression in Cell Cultures
Previous Article in Journal
Methods to Monitor and Quantify Autophagy in the Social Amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessFeature PaperReview
Cells 2017, 6(3), 19; doi:10.3390/cells6030019

Vascular Mechanobiology: Towards Control of In Situ Regeneration

1
Department of Biomedical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven, The Netherlands
2
Institute for Complex Molecular Systems, Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven, The Netherlands
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 20 May 2017 / Revised: 16 June 2017 / Accepted: 23 June 2017 / Published: 3 July 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tissue Regeneration and Fibrosis)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [4132 KB, uploaded 21 July 2017]   |  

Abstract

The paradigm of regenerative medicine has recently shifted from in vitro to in situ tissue engineering: implanting a cell-free, biodegradable, off-the-shelf available scaffold and inducing the development of functional tissue by utilizing the regenerative potential of the body itself. This approach offers a prospect of not only alleviating the clinical demand for autologous vessels but also circumventing the current challenges with synthetic grafts. In order to move towards a hypothesis-driven engineering approach, we review three crucial aspects that need to be taken into account when regenerating vessels: (1) the structure-function relation for attaining mechanical homeostasis of vascular tissues, (2) the environmental cues governing cell function, and (3) the available experimental platforms to test instructive scaffolds for in situ tissue engineering. The understanding of cellular responses to environmental cues leads to the development of computational models to predict tissue formation and maturation, which are validated using experimental platforms recapitulating the (patho)physiological micro-environment. With the current advances, a progressive shift is anticipated towards a rational and effective approach of building instructive scaffolds for in situ vascular tissue regeneration. View Full-Text
Keywords: in situ tissue engineering; regeneration; vessels; mechanotransduction; mechanosensing; growth and remodeling; tissue homeostasis; scaffolds in situ tissue engineering; regeneration; vessels; mechanotransduction; mechanosensing; growth and remodeling; tissue homeostasis; scaffolds
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

van Haaften, E.E.; Bouten, C.V.C.; Kurniawan, N.A. Vascular Mechanobiology: Towards Control of In Situ Regeneration. Cells 2017, 6, 19.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Cells EISSN 2073-4409 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top