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Agronomy 2018, 8(8), 137; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy8080137

Pod Shattering: A Homologous Series of Variation Underlying Domestication and an Avenue for Crop Improvement

1
Department of Plant Sciences, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK 57N 5E8, Canada
2
Department of Soil Science and Plant Nutrition, Faculty of Agriculture, Selcuk University, Konya 42079, Turkey
3
Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT 05405, USA
4
Department of Plant Sciences, University of California Davis, Davis, CA 95616, USA
5
Department of Field Crops, Faculty of Agriculture, Harran University, Sanliurfa 63300, Turkey
These authors contributed equally to this work.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 10 June 2018 / Revised: 20 July 2018 / Accepted: 1 August 2018 / Published: 3 August 2018
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Abstract

In wild habitats, fruit dehiscence is a critical strategy for seed dispersal; however, in cultivated crops it is one of the major sources of yield loss. Therefore, indehiscence of fruits, pods, etc., was likely to be one of the first traits strongly selected in crop domestication. Even with the historical selection against dehiscence in early domesticates, it is a trait still targeted in many breeding programs, particularly in minor or underutilized crops. Here, we review dehiscence in pulse (grain legume) crops, which are of growing importance as a source of protein in human and livestock diets, and which have received less attention than cereal crops and the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We specifically focus on the (i) history of indehiscence in domestication across legumes, (ii) structures and the mechanisms involved in shattering, (iii) the molecular pathways underlying this important trait, (iv) an overview of the extent of crop losses due to shattering, and the effects of environmental factors on shattering, and, (v) efforts to reduce shattering in crops. While our focus is mainly pulse crops, we also included comparisons to crucifers and cereals because there is extensive research on shattering in these taxa. View Full-Text
Keywords: abscission layer; artificial selection; crop domestication; dehiscence; legumes; seed dispersal abscission layer; artificial selection; crop domestication; dehiscence; legumes; seed dispersal
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
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Ogutcen, E.; Pandey, A.; Khan, M.K.; Marques, E.; Penmetsa, R.V.; Kahraman, A.; von Wettberg, E.J.B. Pod Shattering: A Homologous Series of Variation Underlying Domestication and an Avenue for Crop Improvement. Agronomy 2018, 8, 137.

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