Next Article in Journal
Breeding for Quality Protein Maize (QPM) Varieties: A Review
Previous Article in Journal
Determination of Micronutrient Accumulation in Greenhouse Cucumber Crop Using a Modeling Approach
Previous Article in Special Issue
Yield Stability in Winter Wheat Production: A Survey on German Farmers’ and Advisors’ Views
Article Menu
Issue 4 (December) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Agronomy 2017, 7(4), 78; doi:10.3390/agronomy7040078

In-Vitro Inhibition of Pythium ultimum, Fusarium graminearum, and Rhizoctonia solani by a Stabilized Lactoperoxidase System alone and in Combination with Synthetic Fungicides

Zymtronix Catalytic Systems Inc., Kevin M. McGovern Center for Venture Development in the Life Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 30 October 2017 / Revised: 17 November 2017 / Accepted: 21 November 2017 / Published: 23 November 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biological Technology Platforms Accelerating Crop Improvement)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [268 KB, uploaded 24 November 2017]

Abstract

Advances in enzyme stabilization and immobilization make the use of enzymes for industrial applications increasingly feasible. The lactoperoxidase (LPO) system is a naturally occurring enzyme system with known antimicrobial activity. Stabilized LPO and glucose oxidase (GOx) enzymes were combined with glucose, potassium iodide, and ammonium thiocyanate to create an anti-fungal formulation, which inhibited in-vitro growth of the plant pathogenic oomycete Pythium ultimum, and the plant pathogenic fungi Fusarium graminearum and Rhizoctonia solani. Pythium ultimum was more sensitive than F. graminearum and R. solani, and was killed at LPO and GOx concentrations of 20 nM and 26 nM, respectively. Rhizoctonia solani and F. graminearum were 70% to 80% inhibited by LPO and GOx concentrations of 242 nM and 315 nM, respectively. The enzyme system was tested for compatibility with five commercial fungicides as co-treatments. The majority of enzyme + fungicide co-treatments resulted in additive activity. Synergism ranging from 7% to 36% above the expected additive activity was observed when P. ultimum was exposed to the enzyme system combined with Daconil® (active ingredient (AI): chlorothalonil 29.6%, GardenTech, Lexington, KY, USA), tea tree oil, and mancozeb at select fungicide concentrations. Antagonism was observed when the enzyme system was combined with Tilt® (AI: propiconazole 41.8%, Syngenta, Basel, Switzerland) at one fungicide concentration, resulting in activity 24% below the expected additive activity at that concentration. View Full-Text
Keywords: Pythium; Fusarium; Rhizoctonia; enzyme stabilization; lactoperoxidase; glucose oxidase; fungicide Pythium; Fusarium; Rhizoctonia; enzyme stabilization; lactoperoxidase; glucose oxidase; fungicide
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Hansen, Z.R.; Donnelly, M.K.; Corgié, S. In-Vitro Inhibition of Pythium ultimum, Fusarium graminearum, and Rhizoctonia solani by a Stabilized Lactoperoxidase System alone and in Combination with Synthetic Fungicides. Agronomy 2017, 7, 78.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Agronomy EISSN 2073-4395 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top