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Crystals, Volume 1, Issue 1 (March 2011), Pages 1-21

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial Welcome to Crystals: A New Open-Access, Multidisciplinary Forum for Growth, Structures and Properties of Crystals
Crystals 2011, 1(1), 1-2; doi:10.3390/cryst1010001
Received: 14 December 2010 / Accepted: 15 December 2010 / Published: 17 December 2010
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Abstract
The majority of the earth’s crust is made up of crystalline material. The research areas of mineralogy, petrology, chimie minerále (inorganic chemistry) and, of course, crystallography outgrew from the fascination of mankind with the color and symmetry of crystals. Crystals have translational symmetry
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The majority of the earth’s crust is made up of crystalline material. The research areas of mineralogy, petrology, chimie minerále (inorganic chemistry) and, of course, crystallography outgrew from the fascination of mankind with the color and symmetry of crystals. Crystals have translational symmetry in two or three dimensions, quasicrystals have translational symmetry in higher spaces. Further symmetries may be observed by the eye, by microscopic techniques or by the diffraction of X-ray, electron, or neutron beams. Diffraction techniques are also used, due to Max von Laue’s eminent discovery a century ago, to determine crystal structures. [...] Full article

Research

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Open AccessArticle New Layered Oxide-Fluoride Perovskites: KNaNbOF5 and KNaMO2F4 (M = Mo6+, W6+)
Crystals 2011, 1(1), 3-14; doi:10.3390/cryst1010003
Received: 24 February 2011 / Revised: 9 March 2011 / Accepted: 16 March 2011 / Published: 18 March 2011
Cited by 22 | PDF Full-text (3047 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
KNaNbOF5 and KNaMO2F4 (M = Mo6+, W6+), three new layered oxide-fluoride perovskites with the general formula ABB’X6, form from the combination of a second-order Jahn-Teller d0 transition metal and
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KNaNbOF5 and KNaMO2F4 (M = Mo6+, W6+), three new layered oxide-fluoride perovskites with the general formula ABB’X6, form from the combination of a second-order Jahn-Teller d0 transition metal and an alkali metal (Na+) on the B-site. Alternating layers of cation vacancies and K+ cations on the A-site complete the structure. The K+ cations are found in the A-site layer where the fluoride ions are located. The A-site is vacant in the adjacent A-site layer where the axial oxides are located. This unusual layered arrangement of unoccupied A-sites and under bonded oxygen has not been observed previously although many perovskite-related structures are known. Full article
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Open AccessArticle The First Lanthanide Telluride-Bromide: La3Te4Br, a Valence Compound
Crystals 2011, 1(1), 15-21; doi:10.3390/cryst1010015
Received: 21 February 2011 / Revised: 10 March 2011 / Accepted: 18 March 2011 / Published: 21 March 2011
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (574 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The first ternary lanthanide telluride-bromide La3Te4Br was obtained from a mixture of LaTe and LaBr3 (in the presence of iridium) in a sealed tantalum container at elevated temperatures. The crystal structure (orthorhombic, Pnma, a = 1634.3(2), b = 435.0(1), c = 1426.6(2) pm,
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The first ternary lanthanide telluride-bromide La3Te4Br was obtained from a mixture of LaTe and LaBr3 (in the presence of iridium) in a sealed tantalum container at elevated temperatures. The crystal structure (orthorhombic, Pnma, a = 1634.3(2), b = 435.0(1), c = 1426.6(2) pm, Z = 4, R1 (I0 > 2s(I0)) = 0.0349) is built from dicapped trigonal prisms of tellurium and bromine atoms surrounding lanthanum in two different ways. The dicapped trigonal prisms are connected via common edges to a threedimensional structure, in the same fashion as is known for the binary U3Te5. La3Te4Br is a valence compound according to (La3+)3(Te2-)4(Br-) and one out of three lanthanide telluride-halides known to date. Full article
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