Next Article in Journal
In Situ Spectroscopic Studies of Proton Transport in Zeolite Catalysts for NH3-SCR
Previous Article in Journal
Recent Breakthroughs in the Conversion of Ethanol to Butadiene
Previous Article in Special Issue
Controlling Active Site Loop Dynamics in the (β/α)8 Barrel Enzyme Indole-3-Glycerol Phosphate Synthase
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessReview
Catalysts 2016, 6(12), 205; doi:10.3390/catal6120205

Nature Inspired Solutions for Polymers: Will Cutinase Enzymes Make Polyesters and Polyamides Greener?

1
Laboratory of Applied and Computational Biocatalysis, Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche e Farmaceutiche, Università degli Studi di Trieste, Piazzale Europa 1, 34127 Trieste, Italy
2
Department of Agrobiotechnology, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna, Konrad Lorenz Strasse 20, 3430 Tulln an der Donau, Austria
3
Division of enzymes & polymers, Austrian Centre of Industrial Biotechnology, Konrad Lorenz Strasse 20, 3430 Tulln an der Donau, Austria
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: David D. Boehr and Keith Hohn
Received: 31 October 2016 / Revised: 26 November 2016 / Accepted: 7 December 2016 / Published: 13 December 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Enzyme Catalysis)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [2357 KB, uploaded 13 December 2016]   |  

Abstract

The polymer and plastic sectors are under the urge of mitigating their environmental impact. The need for novel and more benign catalysts for polyester synthesis or targeted functionalization led, in recent years, to an increasing interest towards cutinases due to their natural ability to hydrolyze ester bonds in cutin, a natural polymer. In this review, the most recent advances in the synthesis and hydrolysis of various classes of polyesters and polyamides are discussed with a critical focus on the actual perspectives of applying enzymatic technologies for practical industrial purposes. More specifically, cutinase enzymes are compared to lipases and, in particular, to lipase B from Candida antarctica, the biocatalyst most widely employed in polymer chemistry so far. Computational and bioinformatics studies suggest that the natural role of cutinases in attacking natural polymers confer some essential features for processing also synthetic polyesters and polyamides. View Full-Text
Keywords: cutinases; enzymatic polyesters synthesis; green polymer synthesis; enzymatic polymer hydrolysis cutinases; enzymatic polyesters synthesis; green polymer synthesis; enzymatic polymer hydrolysis
Figures

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Ferrario, V.; Pellis, A.; Cespugli, M.; Guebitz, G.M.; Gardossi, L. Nature Inspired Solutions for Polymers: Will Cutinase Enzymes Make Polyesters and Polyamides Greener? Catalysts 2016, 6, 205.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Catalysts EISSN 2073-4344 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top