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Micromachines 2014, 5(4), 1287-1295; doi:10.3390/mi5041287

Motility Control of Bacteria-Actuated Biodegradable Polymeric Microstructures by Selective Adhesion Methods

Inter-University Semiconductor Research Center, Automation System Research Institute, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744, Korea
This paper is an extended version of our paper published in the 7th Asia-Pacific Conference on Transducers and Micro/Nano Technologies (APCOT 2014), Daegu, Korea, 29 June–2 July 2014.
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Received: 21 August 2014 / Revised: 14 November 2014 / Accepted: 21 November 2014 / Published: 28 November 2014
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microactuators)
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Abstract

Certain bacteria have motility and can be made non-toxic, and using them for drug delivery has been proposed. For example, using bacteria with flagella motion in multiple spin actuators in drug delivery microrobots has been suggested. This paper investigates various adhesion enhancement methods for attaching bacteria on preferred surfaces of cubic polymeric microstructures to achieve the directional control of motion. Serratia marcescens which has an excellent swimming behavior and 50-μm sized cubic structures made of biodegradable poly-capro-lactone (PCL) are used. Three treatment methods are investigated and compared to the untreated control case. The first method is retarding bacterial attachments by coating certain surfaces with bovine serum albumin (BSA) which makes those surfaces anti-adherent to bacteria. The second and third methods are roughening the surfaces with X-ray irradiation and plasma respectively to purposely increase bacterial attachments on the roughened surfaces. The measured motilities of bacteria-tethered PCL microactuators are 1.40 μm/s for the BSA coating method, 0.82 μm/s for the X-ray irradiation, and 3.89 μm/s for the plasma treatment method. Therefore, among the methods investigated in the paper the plasma treatment method achieves the highest directionality control of bacteria motility. View Full-Text
Keywords: microactuators; microrobot; targeted drug delivery; bacteria; bacteria-tethering; Serratia marcescens; selective bacterial attachment; BSA coating; X-ray irradiation; plasma treatment; biodegradable polymer microactuators; microrobot; targeted drug delivery; bacteria; bacteria-tethering; Serratia marcescens; selective bacterial attachment; BSA coating; X-ray irradiation; plasma treatment; biodegradable polymer
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Yoo, H.J.; Lee, S.; Cho, D.-I.D. Motility Control of Bacteria-Actuated Biodegradable Polymeric Microstructures by Selective Adhesion Methods. Micromachines 2014, 5, 1287-1295.

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