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Toxins 2016, 8(1), 22; doi:10.3390/toxins8010022

Incobotulinum Toxin-A Improves Post-Surgical and Post-Radiation Pain in Cancer Patients

1
Department of Neurology, Yale University School of Medicine, 15 York Street, LCI Building, New Haven, CT 06520, USA
2
Department of Neurology, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH 44106-5040, USA
3
Department of Surgery, Bridgeport Hospital, 267 Grant Street, Bridgeport, CT 06610, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Michel R. Popoff
Received: 21 August 2015 / Revised: 10 December 2015 / Accepted: 23 December 2015 / Published: 13 January 2016
(This article belongs to the Collection Botulinum Toxins on Human Pain)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [202 KB, uploaded 13 January 2016]

Abstract

Cancer patients who undergo surgery or radiation can develop persistent focal pain at the site of radiation or surgery. Twelve patients who had surgery or radiation for local cancer and failed at least two analgesic medications for pain control were prospectively enrolled in a research protocol. Patients were injected up to 100 units of incobotulinum toxin A (IncoA) intramuscularly or subcutaneously depending on the type and location of pain (muscle cramp or neuropathic pain). Two patients passed away, one dropped out due to a skin reaction and another patient could not return for the follow up due to his poor general condition. All remaining 8 subjects (Age 31–70, 4 female) demonstrated significant improvement of Visual Analog Scale (VAS) (3 to 9 degrees, average 3.9 degrees) and reported significant satisfaction in Patients’ Global Impression of Change scale (PGIC) (7 out of 8 reported the pain as much improved). Three of the 8 patients reported significant improvement of quality of life. View Full-Text
Keywords: incobotulinum toxin A; onabotulinum toxin A; radiation; Patients’ Global Impression of Change; surgery; cancer pain; visual analog scale incobotulinum toxin A; onabotulinum toxin A; radiation; Patients’ Global Impression of Change; surgery; cancer pain; visual analog scale
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Rostami, R.; Mittal, S.O.; Radmand, R.; Jabbari, B. Incobotulinum Toxin-A Improves Post-Surgical and Post-Radiation Pain in Cancer Patients. Toxins 2016, 8, 22.

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