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Nutrients 2017, 9(9), 996; doi:10.3390/nu9090996

Weight Management Interventions in Women with and without PCOS: A Systematic Review

1
Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Department of Physiology, Sahlgrenska academy, University of Gothenburg, Box 430, 405 30 Gothenburg, Sweden
2
Department of Obstetrics and Gyneacology, NU Hospital Groups, Lärketorpsvägen 4, 461 73 Trollhättan, Sweden
3
Monash Centre for Health Research and Implementation, School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Locked Bag 29, Clayton, VIC 3168, Australia
4
Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden
5
Monash Partners Academic Health Sciences Centre, Locked Bag 29, Clayton, VIC 3168, Australia
6
Robinson Research Institute, School of Paediatrics and Reproductive Health, University of Adelaide, 55 King William Street, North Adelaide, SA 5006, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 18 July 2017 / Revised: 28 August 2017 / Accepted: 5 September 2017 / Published: 8 September 2017
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Abstract

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common endocrinopathy among women associated with reproductive, metabolic and psychological features. While weight management is recommended as first-line treatment, it is unclear if women with PCOS achieve similar benefits as women without PCOS. This systematic review thus aimed to compare the efficacy of weight management interventions in women with and without PCOS. Databases were searched until May 2017. The primary outcome was weight and anthropometric, reproductive, metabolic and psychological measures were secondary outcomes. Of 3264 articles identified, 14 studies involving n = 933 (n = 9 high and n = 5 moderate risk of bias) met the inclusion criteria. No statistically significant differences in weight or weight loss following the intervention were found between women with and without PCOS in five studies, with the remaining studies not comparing the difference in weight or weight loss between these groups. Secondary outcomes did not differ significantly between the two groups. This review identified that there is a paucity of high quality research in this area and that more rigorous research is needed. View Full-Text
Keywords: polycystic ovary syndrome; obesity; insulin resistance; weight loss; systematic review polycystic ovary syndrome; obesity; insulin resistance; weight loss; systematic review
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MDPI and ACS Style

Kataoka, J.; Tassone, E.C.; Misso, M.; Joham, A.E.; Stener-Victorin, E.; Teede, H.; Moran, L.J. Weight Management Interventions in Women with and without PCOS: A Systematic Review. Nutrients 2017, 9, 996.

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