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Nutrients 2017, 9(9), 944; doi:10.3390/nu9090944

Increases in Alcohol Intakes Are Concurrent with Higher Energy Intakes: Trends in Alcohol Consumption in Australian National Surveys from 1983, 1995 and 2012

The University of Sydney, Nutrition and Dietetics Group, The School of Life and Environmental Sciences, The Charles Perkins Centre, John Hopkins Drive, Camperdown, NSW 2006, Australia
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Received: 28 July 2017 / Revised: 16 August 2017 / Accepted: 23 August 2017 / Published: 28 August 2017
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Abstract

This research aimed to provide the first assessment of the contribution of alcohol to Australian adults’ diets over time and determine if people reporting alcohol had higher total dietary energy intakes. Secondary analyses of cross-sectional national nutrition surveys from 1983, 1995, and 2011/12 for adults 18 years (n = 26,675) and over were conducted. Alcoholic beverage intake and diet were assessed using 24-h recalls. The proportion of participants reporting alcohol consumption declined over time and in 1983, 1995, and 2011/12 was 52.0%, 44.2%, and 39.8%, respectively, for men (p < 0.001) and 31.6%, 25.7%, and 25.7%, respectively, for women (p < 0.001). A decline in alcohol intake was seen between 1983 and 2012 for all subpopulations, except for women aged over 45 years, for whom alcohol intake increased. Energy intake was higher for participants reporting alcohol intake and the mean difference (SD) in energy intake for those reporting alcohol versus non-consumers was +1514 kJ (462) for men and +1227 kJ (424) for women. Consistent with apparent consumption data, reported alcohol intake for the total population decreased over time. As those reporting alcohol had much higher energy intakes than non-consumers, promoting alcohol intakes consistent with national recommendations may have important implications for the prevention of obesity, particularly for middle-aged women. View Full-Text
Keywords: alcoholic beverage; adults; alcohol drinking; energy intake; obesity alcoholic beverage; adults; alcohol drinking; energy intake; obesity
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Grech, A.; Rangan, A.; Allman-Farinelli, M. Increases in Alcohol Intakes Are Concurrent with Higher Energy Intakes: Trends in Alcohol Consumption in Australian National Surveys from 1983, 1995 and 2012. Nutrients 2017, 9, 944.

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