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Nutrients 2017, 9(9), 1033; doi:10.3390/nu9091033

Caffeine Improves Basketball Performance in Experienced Basketball Players

1
Exercise Physiology Laboratory, Camilo José Cela University, 28692 Madrid, Spain
2
Performance and Sport Rehabilitation Laboratory, University of Castilla La Mancha, 45071 Toledo, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 30 June 2017 / Revised: 25 August 2017 / Accepted: 13 September 2017 / Published: 19 September 2017
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Abstract

The aim of this study was to determine the effect of caffeine intake on overall basketball performance in experienced players. A double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized experimental design was used for this investigation. In two different sessions separated by one week, 20 experienced basketball players ingested 3 mg of caffeine/kg of body mass or a placebo. After 60 min, participants performed 10 repetitions of the following sequence: Abalakov jump, Change-of-Direction and Acceleration Test (CODAT) and two free throws. Later, heart rate, body impacts and game statistics were recorded during a 20-min simulated basketball game. In comparison to the placebo, the ingestion of caffeine increased mean jump height (37.3 ± 6.8 vs. 38.2 ± 7.4 cm; p = 0.012), but did not change mean time in the CODAT test or accuracy in free throws. During the simulated game, caffeine increased the number of body impacts (396 ± 43 vs. 410 ± 41 impacts/min; p < 0.001) without modifying mean or peak heart rate. Caffeine also increased the performance index rating (7.2 ± 8.6 vs. 10.6 ± 7.1; p = 0.037) during the game. Nevertheless, players showed a higher prevalence of insomnia (19.0 vs. 54.4%; p = 0.041) after the game. Three mg of caffeine per kg of body mass could be an effective ergogenic substance to increase physical performance and overall success in experienced basketball players. View Full-Text
Keywords: ergogenic aids; stimulants; team sport; elite athlete; side effects ergogenic aids; stimulants; team sport; elite athlete; side effects
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MDPI and ACS Style

Puente, C.; Abián-Vicén, J.; Salinero, J.J.; Lara, B.; Areces, F.; Del Coso, J. Caffeine Improves Basketball Performance in Experienced Basketball Players. Nutrients 2017, 9, 1033.

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