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Nutrients 2017, 9(9), 1029; doi:10.3390/nu9091029

Association between Dietary Patterns of Meat and Fish Consumption with Bone Mineral Density or Fracture Risk: A Systematic Literature

1
Department of Public Health, Experimental and Forensic Medicine, School of Medicine, Endocrinology and Nutrition Unit, University of Pavia, Azienda di Servizi alla Persona di Pavia, Pavia 27100, Italy
2
CRIAMS-Sport Medicine Centre, University of Pavia, Voghera 27058, Italy
3
Department of Public Health, Experimental and Forensic Medicine, University of Pavia, Pavia 27100, Italy
The two authors contributed equally to this work.
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 30 June 2017 / Revised: 31 August 2017 / Accepted: 11 September 2017 / Published: 18 September 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Meat Consumption and Human Health)
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Abstract

This systematic review aimed to investigate the association of fish and sea fish dietary patterns (FishDiet) and meat or processed meat dietary patterns (MeatDiet) with bone mineral density (BMD) and/or risk of fractures (RF). This review includes 37 studies with a total of 432,924 subjects. The results suggest that MeatDiet and FishDiet did not affect BMD or RF in 48.2% of the subjects with MeatDiet and in 86.5% of the subjects with FishDiet. Positive effects on bone were found in 3% of subjects with MeatDiet and in 12% with FishDiet. Negative effects on bone were observed in 2.7% of FishDiet and in 47.9% of MeatDiet. Major negative effects of MeatDiet were found in subjects located in the Netherlands, Greece, Germany, Italy, Norway, UK and Spain who do not sustain a Mediterranean diet (92.7%); in Korea (27.1%); in Brazil and Mexico (96.4%); and in Australia (62.5%). This study suggests that protein intake from fish or meat is not harmful to bone. Negative effects on bone linked to FishDiet are almost null. Negative effects on bone were associated to MeatDiet in the setting of a Western Diet but not in Mediterranean or Asian Diets. View Full-Text
Keywords: meat; fish; osteoporosis; fractures; bone; Asian; Mediterranean; diet; animal proteins meat; fish; osteoporosis; fractures; bone; Asian; Mediterranean; diet; animal proteins
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Perna, S.; Avanzato, I.; Nichetti, M.; D’Antona, G.; Negro, M.; Rondanelli, M. Association between Dietary Patterns of Meat and Fish Consumption with Bone Mineral Density or Fracture Risk: A Systematic Literature. Nutrients 2017, 9, 1029.

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