Next Article in Journal / Special Issue
Food Sources of Sodium Intake in an Adult Mexican Population: A Sub-Analysis of the SALMEX Study
Previous Article in Journal
Disparities in Snacking Trends in US Adults over a 35 Year Period from 1977 to 2012
Previous Article in Special Issue
Salt Reductions in Some Foods in The Netherlands: Monitoring of Food Composition and Salt Intake
Article Menu
Issue 8 (August) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Nutrients 2017, 9(8), 808; doi:10.3390/nu9080808

Stages of Behavioral Change for Reducing Sodium Intake in Korean Consumers: Comparison of Characteristics Based on Social Cognitive Theory

1
Department of Food Science and Nutrition, The Catholic University of Korea, Bucheon 14662, Korea
2
Department of Food and Nutrition, Shingu College, Songnam 13174, Korea
3
Department of Food and Nutrition, Baewha Women’s University, Seoul 03039, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 18 June 2017 / Revised: 20 July 2017 / Accepted: 25 July 2017 / Published: 27 July 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Reducing Dietary Sodium and Improving Human Health)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [256 KB, uploaded 27 July 2017]

Abstract

High sodium intake increases the risk of cardiovascular disease. Given the importance of behavioral changes to reducing sodium intake, this study aims to investigate the stages of change and the differences in cognitive and behavioral characteristics by stage in Korean consumers. Adult participants (N = 3892) completed a questionnaire on the stages of behavioral change, recognition of social efforts, outcome expectancy, barriers to practice, nutrition knowledge and dietary behaviors, and self-efficiency related to reduced sodium intake. The numbers of participants in each stage of behavioral change for reducing sodium intake was 29.5% in the maintenance stage, 19.5% in the action stage, and 51.0% in the preaction stage that included the precontemplation, contemplation, and preparation stages. Multiple logistic regression showed that the factors differentiating the three stages were recognizing a supportive social environment, perceived barriers to the practice of reducing sodium intake, and self-efficacy to be conscious of sodium content and to request less salt when eating out. Purchasing experience of sodium-reduced products for salty foods, knowledge of the recommended intake of salt and the difference between sodium and salt, and improving dietary habits of eating salted fish, processed food, and salty snacks were factors for being in the action stage versus the preaction stage. These findings suggest that tailored intervention according to the characteristics of each stage is helpful in reducing sodium intake. View Full-Text
Keywords: stage of behavioral change; reducing sodium intake; consumer; social cognitive theory stage of behavioral change; reducing sodium intake; consumer; social cognitive theory
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Supplementary material

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Ahn, S.-H.; Kwon, J.S.; Kim, K.; Kim, H.-K. Stages of Behavioral Change for Reducing Sodium Intake in Korean Consumers: Comparison of Characteristics Based on Social Cognitive Theory. Nutrients 2017, 9, 808.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Nutrients EISSN 2072-6643 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top