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Nutrients 2017, 9(4), 393; doi:10.3390/nu9040393

Differential Effect of Sucrose and Fructose in Combination with a High Fat Diet on Intestinal Microbiota and Kidney Oxidative Stress

1
Departamento de Fisiología de la Nutrición, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán, México D.F. 14080, Mexico
2
Departamento de Nefrologia, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán, México D.F. 14080, Mexico
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 23 February 2017 / Revised: 4 April 2017 / Accepted: 13 April 2017 / Published: 16 April 2017
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Abstract

There is controversial information about the adverse effect of sucrose (S) or fructose (F) in the development of obesity. Thus, the purpose of the study was to evaluate the effect of S or F in a high fat diet (HF) on gut microbiota and renal oxidative stress. Rats were fed for four months with either high-fat + sucrose (HFS) or high-fat + fructose (HFF) or a control diet (C). Half of the HFS or HFF groups were maintained with the same diet and the other half were switched to the consumption of C. HFS and HFF groups increased 51% and 19% body weight, respectively, compared with the C group. Body fat mass, metabolic inflexibility, glucose intolerance, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), insulin, renal reactive oxygen species (ROS), malondialdehyde (MDA), Nadphox, and Srebp-1 were significantly higher and antioxidant enzymes and lean body mass were significantly lower in the HFS group with respect to the HF-F group. Change in the consumption of HFS or HFF to a C diet ameliorated the insulin and glucose intolerance. The type of carbohydrate differentially modified the microbiota composition, however, both groups significantly decreased C. eutactus with respect to the C group. Thus, metabolic alterations with the HFS diet had a more detrimental effect than HFF. View Full-Text
Keywords: microbiota; renal oxidative stress; sucrose; fructose; obesity; LPS; inflammation microbiota; renal oxidative stress; sucrose; fructose; obesity; LPS; inflammation
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MDPI and ACS Style

Rosas-Villegas, A.; Sánchez-Tapia, M.; Avila-Nava, A.; Ramírez, V.; Tovar, A.R.; Torres, N. Differential Effect of Sucrose and Fructose in Combination with a High Fat Diet on Intestinal Microbiota and Kidney Oxidative Stress. Nutrients 2017, 9, 393.

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