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Nutrients 2017, 9(12), 1365; doi:10.3390/nu9121365

Capsaicin: Friend or Foe in Skin Cancer and Other Related Malignancies?

1
Department of Dermatology, Carol DavilaUniversity of Medicine and Pharmacy, 020021 Bucharest, Romania
2
Department of Biochemistry, Carol Davila University of Medicine and Pharmacy, 020021 Bucharest, Romania
3
Department of Physiology, Carol Davila University of Medicine and Pharmacy, 050474 Bucharest, Romania
4
Department of Dermatology, Prof. N.C. Paulescu National Institute of Diabetes, Nutrition and Metabolic Diseases, 011233 Bucharest, Romania
5
Immunology Department, Victor Babes National Institute of Pathology, 050096 Bucharest, Romania
6
Faculty of Biology, University of Bucharest, 76201 Bucharest, Romania
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 15 November 2017 / Revised: 11 December 2017 / Accepted: 12 December 2017 / Published: 16 December 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutraceuticals and the Skin: Roles in Health and Disease)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [660 KB, uploaded 16 December 2017]   |  

Abstract

Capsaicin is the main pungent in chili peppers, one of the most commonly used spices in the world; its analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties have been proven in various cultures for centuries. It is a lipophilic substance belonging to the class of vanilloids and an agonist of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 receptor. Taking into consideration the complex neuro-immune impact of capsaicin and the potential link between inflammation and carcinogenesis, the effect of capsaicin on muco-cutaneous cancer has aroused a growing interest. The aim of this review is to look over the most recent data regarding the connection between capsaicin and muco-cutaneous cancers, with emphasis on melanoma and muco-cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma. View Full-Text
Keywords: capsaicin; skin; neurogenic inflammation; cancer; carcinogenesis; squamous cell carcinoma; melanoma capsaicin; skin; neurogenic inflammation; cancer; carcinogenesis; squamous cell carcinoma; melanoma
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Georgescu, S.-R.; Sârbu, M.-I.; Matei, C.; Ilie, M.A.; Caruntu, C.; Constantin, C.; Neagu, M.; Tampa, M. Capsaicin: Friend or Foe in Skin Cancer and Other Related Malignancies? Nutrients 2017, 9, 1365.

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