Next Article in Journal
Estimating Free and Added Sugar Intakes in New Zealand
Previous Article in Journal
Bacteriological and Immunological Profiling of Meconium and Fecal Samples from Preterm Infants: A Two-Year Follow-Up Study
Article Menu
Issue 12 (December) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Nutrients 2017, 9(12), 1291; doi:10.3390/nu9121291

The Effect of a Diet Moderately High in Protein and Fiber on Insulin Sensitivity Measured Using the Dynamic Insulin Sensitivity and Secretion Test (DISST)

1
Department of Human Nutrition, University of Otago, PO Box 56, Dunedin 9054, New Zealand
2
Edgar Diabetes and Obesity Research Centre, University of Otago, Dunedin 9054, New Zealand
3
Riddet Institute, University of Otago, PO Box 56, Dunedin 9054, New Zealand
4
Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Canterbury, Christchurch 8140, New Zealand
5
Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, University of Otago, Dunedin 9054, New Zealand
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 8 November 2017 / Revised: 24 November 2017 / Accepted: 24 November 2017 / Published: 27 November 2017
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [259 KB, uploaded 27 November 2017]

Abstract

Evidence shows that weight loss improves insulin sensitivity but few studies have examined the effect of macronutrient composition independently of weight loss on direct measures of insulin sensitivity. We randomised 89 overweight or obese women to either a standard diet (StdD), that was intended to be low in fat and relatively high in carbohydrate (n = 42) or to a relatively high protein (up to 30% of energy), relatively high fibre (>30 g/day) diet (HPHFib) (n = 47) for 10 weeks. Advice regarding strict adherence to energy intake goals was not given. Insulin sensitivity and secretion was assessed by a novel method—the Dynamic Insulin Sensitivity and Secretion Test (DISST). Although there were significant improvements in body composition and most cardiometabolic risk factors on HPHFib, insulin sensitivity was reduced by 19.3% (95% CI: 31.8%, 4.5%; p = 0.013) in comparison with StdD. We conclude that the reduction in insulin sensitivity after a diet relatively high in both protein and fibre, despite cardiometabolic improvements, suggests insulin sensitivity may reflect metabolic adaptations to dietary composition for maintenance of glucose homeostasis, rather than impaired metabolism. View Full-Text
Keywords: diet; dietary protein; dietary fibre; insulin sensitivity assessment; insulin sensitivity; insulin resistance; metabolic syndrome diet; dietary protein; dietary fibre; insulin sensitivity assessment; insulin sensitivity; insulin resistance; metabolic syndrome
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Te Morenga, L.; Docherty, P.; Williams, S.; Mann, J. The Effect of a Diet Moderately High in Protein and Fiber on Insulin Sensitivity Measured Using the Dynamic Insulin Sensitivity and Secretion Test (DISST). Nutrients 2017, 9, 1291.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Nutrients EISSN 2072-6643 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top