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Nutrients 2017, 9(11), 1173; doi:10.3390/nu9111173

Social Demography of Transitional Dietary Patterns in Thailand: Prospective Evidence from the Thai Cohort Study

1
National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health (NCEPH) and Department of Global Health, Research School of Population Health, ANU College of Health & Medicine, The Australian National University, Canberra 2601, Australia
2
Population Health Department, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane 4006, Australia
3
The School of Public Health, The University of Queensland, Brisbane 4006, Australia
4
School of Medicine and Public Health, Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle, Newcastle 2308, Australia
5
Centre for Research on Ageing, Health and Wellbeing, Research School of Population Health, The Australian National University, Canberra 2601, Australia
6
Thai Health-Risk Transition Study, School of Human Ecology, Sukhothai Thammathirat Open University, Nonthaburi 11120, Thailand
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 23 September 2017 / Revised: 18 October 2017 / Accepted: 25 October 2017 / Published: 27 October 2017
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Abstract

In recent decades, a health-risk transition with changes in diet and lifestyle in low and middle-income countries (LMICs) led to an emergence of chronic diseases. These trends in Southeast Asian LMICs are not well studied. Here, we report on transitional dietary patterns and their socio-demographic predictors in Thai adults. Dietary data in 2015 were from a random sub-sample (N = 1075) of 42,785 Thai Cohort Study (TCS) members who completed all three TCS surveys (2005, 2009, 2013). Principle Component Analysis identified dietary patterns and multivariable linear regression assessed associations (Beta estimates (ß) and confidence intervals (CIs)) between socio-demographic factors and dietary intake pattern scores. Four dietary patterns emerged: Healthy Transitional, Fatty Western, Highly Processed, and Traditional. In women, higher income (≥30,001 Baht/month vs. ≤10,000) and managerial work (vs. office assistant) was associated with lower scores for Traditional (ß = −0.67, 95% CI −1.15, −0.19) and Fatty Western diets (ß = −0.60, 95% CI −1.14, −0.05), respectively. University education associated with lower Highly Processed (ß = −0.57, 95% CI −0.98, −0.17) and higher Traditional diet scores (ß = 0.42, 95% CI 0.03, 0.81). In men and women, urban residence associated with higher Fatty Western and lower Traditional diets. Local policy makers should promote healthy diets, particularly in urban residents, in men, and in low-SEP adults. View Full-Text
Keywords: socioeconomic status; diet patterns; Asian cohort; urban; nutrition transition; principle component analysis socioeconomic status; diet patterns; Asian cohort; urban; nutrition transition; principle component analysis
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Papier, K.; Jordan, S.; D’Este, C.; Banwell, C.; Yiengprugsawan, V.; Seubsman, S.-A.; Sleigh, A. Social Demography of Transitional Dietary Patterns in Thailand: Prospective Evidence from the Thai Cohort Study. Nutrients 2017, 9, 1173.

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